Advanced

Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation.

Johansson, Barbro LU (2012) In Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
Abstract
The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials... (More)
The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post-stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation. It is proposed that we should pay more attention to age, gender, and laterality in clinical studies. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
volume
6
publisher
Frontiers
external identifiers
  • WOS:000303509700001
  • PMID:22509159
  • Scopus:84933674869
ISSN
1662-5161
DOI
10.3389/fnhum.2012.00060
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6bdb6917-6f17-481e-9220-f5e227e81404 (old id 2519354)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22509159?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-05-06 17:31:49
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:29:45
@misc{6bdb6917-6f17-481e-9220-f5e227e81404,
  abstract     = {The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, and various kinds of music therapy. Non-invasive brain stimulation has showed promising preliminary results in aphasia and neglect. Patient heterogeneity and the interaction of age, gender, genes, and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post-stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation. It is proposed that we should pay more attention to age, gender, and laterality in clinical studies.},
  author       = {Johansson, Barbro},
  issn         = {1662-5161},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8b95988)},
  series       = {Frontiers in Human Neuroscience},
  title        = {Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2012.00060},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2012},
}