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The Influence of Initial Management and Family Stress on Metabolic Control in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

Tiberg, Irén LU ; Hallström, Inger LU and Carlsson, Annelie LU (2010) In International Journal of Clinical Medicine 1(2). p.41-47
Abstract
The aim was to assess whether temporal changes in the initial management for children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes

over a ten year period affected metabolic control two years after diagnosis. A further aim was to investigate if social

factors, registered at diagnosis, had an impact on metabolic control two years after diagnosis. During the years

1997-2006, 247 children and adolescents were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at a University Hospital in Sweden. The

analysed data included HbA1c, pH at diagnosis, initial intravenous insulin infusion and length of hospital stay at diagnosis,

subcutaneous insulin type, number of diabetes check-up visits, emergency visits, re-admissions and social... (More)
The aim was to assess whether temporal changes in the initial management for children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes

over a ten year period affected metabolic control two years after diagnosis. A further aim was to investigate if social

factors, registered at diagnosis, had an impact on metabolic control two years after diagnosis. During the years

1997-2006, 247 children and adolescents were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at a University Hospital in Sweden. The

analysed data included HbA1c, pH at diagnosis, initial intravenous insulin infusion and length of hospital stay at diagnosis,

subcutaneous insulin type, number of diabetes check-up visits, emergency visits, re-admissions and social factors.

Length of hospital stay decreased significantly over the ten year period. Neither hospital stay nor differences in insulin

treatment was significantly correlated with children’s metabolic control over time. Length of hospital stay was not related

with families’ social stress situation. However, girls in families with more family stress at the time of diagnosis

had higher HbA1c during follow-up than girls with less family stress or boys. Factors of importance for the child’s

long-term metabolic control need to be further investigated so the initial management can be tailored to each individual

family’s needs. This would imply an effective utilization of both families’ and health care resources. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Disease Management, Type 1 Diabetes, Patient Admission, Life Stress, Hemoglobin A1c
in
International Journal of Clinical Medicine
volume
1
issue
2
pages
41 - 47
ISSN
2158-2882
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9ef2d2d4-e91d-4671-a983-fd5b034d5054 (old id 2543620)
alternative location
http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?paperID=3230
http://www.researchgate.net/publication/228645562_The_Influence_of_Initial_Management_and_Family_Stress_on_Metabolic_Control_in_Children_with_Type_1_Diabetes/file/d912f509819a9788d3.pdf
date added to LUP
2013-05-07 14:56:49
date last changed
2016-04-16 06:39:29
@misc{9ef2d2d4-e91d-4671-a983-fd5b034d5054,
  abstract     = {The aim was to assess whether temporal changes in the initial management for children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes<br/><br>
over a ten year period affected metabolic control two years after diagnosis. A further aim was to investigate if social<br/><br>
factors, registered at diagnosis, had an impact on metabolic control two years after diagnosis. During the years<br/><br>
1997-2006, 247 children and adolescents were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at a University Hospital in Sweden. The<br/><br>
analysed data included HbA1c, pH at diagnosis, initial intravenous insulin infusion and length of hospital stay at diagnosis,<br/><br>
subcutaneous insulin type, number of diabetes check-up visits, emergency visits, re-admissions and social factors.<br/><br>
Length of hospital stay decreased significantly over the ten year period. Neither hospital stay nor differences in insulin<br/><br>
treatment was significantly correlated with children’s metabolic control over time. Length of hospital stay was not related<br/><br>
with families’ social stress situation. However, girls in families with more family stress at the time of diagnosis<br/><br>
had higher HbA1c during follow-up than girls with less family stress or boys. Factors of importance for the child’s<br/><br>
long-term metabolic control need to be further investigated so the initial management can be tailored to each individual<br/><br>
family’s needs. This would imply an effective utilization of both families’ and health care resources.},
  author       = {Tiberg, Irén and Hallström, Inger and Carlsson, Annelie},
  issn         = {2158-2882},
  keyword      = {Disease Management,Type 1 Diabetes,Patient Admission,Life Stress,Hemoglobin A1c},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {41--47},
  series       = {International Journal of Clinical Medicine},
  title        = {The Influence of Initial Management and Family Stress on Metabolic Control in Children with Type 1 Diabetes},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2010},
}