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Stylistic Levels in Hebrews 1.1−4 and John 1.1−18

Nässelqvist, Dan LU (2012) In Journal for the Study of the New Testament 35(1). p.31-53
Abstract
This article presents the ancient concept of stylistic levels as a means of approaching the question of how New Testament writings were delivered in antiquity. It is argued that the levels of style affected both composition and delivery and that therefore an analysis of the remaining texts is the first step towards understanding how they were

once delivered. The levels of style are presented and the stylistic features of Heb. 1.1-4 and Jn 1.1-18 are analysed and interpreted within this system. It is seen that the style of New Testament writings can be profitably examined, and aspects of their composition

revealed, with the help of the levels of style. Against many commentators, it is argued that the prologue of John does... (More)
This article presents the ancient concept of stylistic levels as a means of approaching the question of how New Testament writings were delivered in antiquity. It is argued that the levels of style affected both composition and delivery and that therefore an analysis of the remaining texts is the first step towards understanding how they were

once delivered. The levels of style are presented and the stylistic features of Heb. 1.1-4 and Jn 1.1-18 are analysed and interpreted within this system. It is seen that the style of New Testament writings can be profitably examined, and aspects of their composition

revealed, with the help of the levels of style. Against many commentators, it is argued that the prologue of John does not contain poetry interspersed with prose passages. Instead, the stylistic intensity is steady at least all the way through Jn 1.1-13. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Levels of style, Gospel of John, Hebrews, orality, performance, rhetoric, style
in
Journal for the Study of the New Testament
volume
35
issue
1
pages
31 - 53
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84871756742
ISSN
0142-064X
DOI
10.1177/0142064X12453660
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7ff399f5-0099-46f1-bb5d-8a35b9963e6c (old id 2911837)
date added to LUP
2012-09-05 08:25:00
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:31:20
@misc{7ff399f5-0099-46f1-bb5d-8a35b9963e6c,
  abstract     = {This article presents the ancient concept of stylistic levels as a means of approaching the question of how New Testament writings were delivered in antiquity. It is argued that the levels of style affected both composition and delivery and that therefore an analysis of the remaining texts is the first step towards understanding how they were<br/><br>
once delivered. The levels of style are presented and the stylistic features of Heb. 1.1-4 and Jn 1.1-18 are analysed and interpreted within this system. It is seen that the style of New Testament writings can be profitably examined, and aspects of their composition<br/><br>
revealed, with the help of the levels of style. Against many commentators, it is argued that the prologue of John does not contain poetry interspersed with prose passages. Instead, the stylistic intensity is steady at least all the way through Jn 1.1-13.},
  author       = {Nässelqvist, Dan},
  issn         = {0142-064X},
  keyword      = {Levels of style,Gospel of John,Hebrews,orality,performance,rhetoric,style},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {31--53},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9b2beb8)},
  series       = {Journal for the Study of the New Testament},
  title        = {Stylistic Levels in Hebrews 1.1−4 and John 1.1−18},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0142064X12453660},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2012},
}