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Institutions and Social Mobilization

Ang, Ming Chee LU (2013) 5th Southeast Asia Update
Abstract
Social movements are series of sustained interactions and collective actions, contentious performances, displays and campaigns by ordinary people outside established political institutions. Yet, why do certain movements persist over a significant period of time while some do not? How do those that persist, sustain themselves and overcome constraints over time, especially those imposed by non-liberal democratic states?



This presentation examines the persistence of social movement despite facing considerable constraints imposed by a non-liberal state. I argue that both structural and relational institutions are crucial in a prolonged movement’s efforts to overcome constraints and sustain social mobilization in a... (More)
Social movements are series of sustained interactions and collective actions, contentious performances, displays and campaigns by ordinary people outside established political institutions. Yet, why do certain movements persist over a significant period of time while some do not? How do those that persist, sustain themselves and overcome constraints over time, especially those imposed by non-liberal democratic states?



This presentation examines the persistence of social movement despite facing considerable constraints imposed by a non-liberal state. I argue that both structural and relational institutions are crucial in a prolonged movement’s efforts to overcome constraints and sustain social mobilization in a non-liberal democratic state. Structural institutions are, in various degrees, significantly influenced by informal relationships—that is, those built on interpersonal networks and trust. Such informal relationships seem to have similar effects, if not more so, on state-social movement interactions than official and structural relations. I argue that social mobilization in non-liberal democratic states tend to develop parallel—at times overlapping—both formal and informal institutions to prolong their existence and increase their opportunities to affect change.



I will share my observation from Malaysia during the presentation. I also look forward for collaboration opportunities with like-minded researchers who specialized in other countries. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
mobilisation, social movements, governance, asia
conference name
5th Southeast Asia Update
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4f6a1f92-9868-4d6b-a149-93b1cbaa9def (old id 4354424)
date added to LUP
2014-03-18 14:35:20
date last changed
2016-07-04 13:31:52
@misc{4f6a1f92-9868-4d6b-a149-93b1cbaa9def,
  abstract     = {Social movements are series of sustained interactions and collective actions, contentious performances, displays and campaigns by ordinary people outside established political institutions. Yet, why do certain movements persist over a significant period of time while some do not? How do those that persist, sustain themselves and overcome constraints over time, especially those imposed by non-liberal democratic states?<br/><br>
<br/><br>
This presentation examines the persistence of social movement despite facing considerable constraints imposed by a non-liberal state. I argue that both structural and relational institutions are crucial in a prolonged movement’s efforts to overcome constraints and sustain social mobilization in a non-liberal democratic state. Structural institutions are, in various degrees, significantly influenced by informal relationships—that is, those built on interpersonal networks and trust. Such informal relationships seem to have similar effects, if not more so, on state-social movement interactions than official and structural relations. I argue that social mobilization in non-liberal democratic states tend to develop parallel—at times overlapping—both formal and informal institutions to prolong their existence and increase their opportunities to affect change.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
I will share my observation from Malaysia during the presentation. I also look forward for collaboration opportunities with like-minded researchers who specialized in other countries.},
  author       = {Ang, Ming Chee},
  keyword      = {mobilisation,social movements,governance,asia},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Institutions and Social Mobilization},
  year         = {2013},
}