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The Urban Water System - a Future Swedish Perspective

Aspegren, H.; Hellström, B. G. and Olsson, Gustaf LU (1997) In Water Science & Technology 35(9). p.33-44
Abstract
It is argued, that the use of water can no longer be regarded as an almost free commodity. The idea to assess and value the environmental impact of the water use represents a true change of paradigm. The key issue is that any future wastewater treatment system has to be evaluated according to a quantitative criterion. This has to consider:



•hygienic aspects: we believe that nobody will accept a lower hygienic standard than today.

•environmental impact: the wastewater impact on the environment has steadily increased the need for better treatment. We need to be prepared for changes in the society by having a readiness manifested as continuing dynamic research environment in this area. Too often the knowledge... (More)
It is argued, that the use of water can no longer be regarded as an almost free commodity. The idea to assess and value the environmental impact of the water use represents a true change of paradigm. The key issue is that any future wastewater treatment system has to be evaluated according to a quantitative criterion. This has to consider:



•hygienic aspects: we believe that nobody will accept a lower hygienic standard than today.

•environmental impact: the wastewater impact on the environment has steadily increased the need for better treatment. We need to be prepared for changes in the society by having a readiness manifested as continuing dynamic research environment in this area. Too often the knowledge build-up has been re-active instead of pro-active.

•economising resources: wastewater treatment looks and probably should look quite different in densely populated urban areas and in rural areas. Considering resource handling one has to consider already invested capital costs, land use, water re-use, organic and nutrient use and re-use, as well as overall use of energy.

•user aspects: technical functionality, economy and liability in different aspects require profound consideration.

A sustainable wastewater treatment has to adapt to a local environment and the total resource demand has to be calculated, including a direct environmental impact on receiving waters, air and soil as well as energy consumption and nutrient recycling. Thus, there is an apparent need for.



•quantitative performance index: the quest for sustainable development has to be based on objective reasons as well as subjective ones. An integrated performance index is part of a necessary decision making model for the design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. In this index, it is evident that a trade-off should be made between the pursued quality of the process outputs (liquid, solids, gas) and the associated efforts (investments, operation) required to achieve this considering the inputs (wastewater). In order to make this trade-off, however, a common framework is needed to quantitatively compare the different objectives.

A metric to judge the sustainability of different options will facilitate a fruitful dialogue between e.g. politicians, ecologists, engineers and economists. Only a truly interdisciplinary approach can help to solve the challenges ahead. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Sustainable technology, urban water, hygiene, criteria
in
Water Science & Technology
volume
35
issue
9
pages
33 - 44
publisher
IWA Publishing
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0030744140
DOI
10.1016/S0273-1223(97)00182-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
68375e46-236f-4eb9-bcaf-3ca37e9b4b69 (old id 4358615)
alternative location
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0273122397001820
date added to LUP
2014-03-12 16:38:58
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:16:45
@misc{68375e46-236f-4eb9-bcaf-3ca37e9b4b69,
  abstract     = {It is argued, that the use of water can no longer be regarded as an almost free commodity. The idea to assess and value the environmental impact of the water use represents a true change of paradigm. The key issue is that any future wastewater treatment system has to be evaluated according to a quantitative criterion. This has to consider:<br/><br>
<br/><br>
•hygienic aspects: we believe that nobody will accept a lower hygienic standard than today.<br/><br>
•environmental impact: the wastewater impact on the environment has steadily increased the need for better treatment. We need to be prepared for changes in the society by having a readiness manifested as continuing dynamic research environment in this area. Too often the knowledge build-up has been re-active instead of pro-active.<br/><br>
•economising resources: wastewater treatment looks and probably should look quite different in densely populated urban areas and in rural areas. Considering resource handling one has to consider already invested capital costs, land use, water re-use, organic and nutrient use and re-use, as well as overall use of energy.<br/><br>
•user aspects: technical functionality, economy and liability in different aspects require profound consideration.<br/><br>
A sustainable wastewater treatment has to adapt to a local environment and the total resource demand has to be calculated, including a direct environmental impact on receiving waters, air and soil as well as energy consumption and nutrient recycling. Thus, there is an apparent need for.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
•quantitative performance index: the quest for sustainable development has to be based on objective reasons as well as subjective ones. An integrated performance index is part of a necessary decision making model for the design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. In this index, it is evident that a trade-off should be made between the pursued quality of the process outputs (liquid, solids, gas) and the associated efforts (investments, operation) required to achieve this considering the inputs (wastewater). In order to make this trade-off, however, a common framework is needed to quantitatively compare the different objectives.<br/><br>
A metric to judge the sustainability of different options will facilitate a fruitful dialogue between e.g. politicians, ecologists, engineers and economists. Only a truly interdisciplinary approach can help to solve the challenges ahead.},
  author       = {Aspegren, H. and Hellström, B. G. and Olsson, Gustaf},
  keyword      = {Sustainable technology,urban water,hygiene,criteria},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {33--44},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9d774a8)},
  series       = {Water Science & Technology},
  title        = {The Urban Water System - a Future Swedish Perspective},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0273-1223(97)00182-0},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {1997},
}