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Biodiversity in temperate European grasslands: origin and conservation.

Pärtel, Meelis; Bruun, Hans Henrik LU and Sammul, Marek (2005) In Grassland Science in Europe 10. p.1-14
Abstract
Northern Europe is in the forest zone, but wild megaherbivores have maintained grass-dominated

vegetation here for the last 1.8 million years. Continuity of the grassland biome through glacialinterglacial

cycles and connection to steppe vegetation has resulted in the evolution, immigration, and

survival of a large number of grassland species. During the last millennia the effect of wild ungulates has

been replaced by domestic grazers and hay making, and the persistence of grassland biodiversity depends

on livestock farming. Local diversity is the outcome of colonisations and extinctions. Colonisations can

be enhanced by maintaining networks of grasslands where species can migrate... (More)
Northern Europe is in the forest zone, but wild megaherbivores have maintained grass-dominated

vegetation here for the last 1.8 million years. Continuity of the grassland biome through glacialinterglacial

cycles and connection to steppe vegetation has resulted in the evolution, immigration, and

survival of a large number of grassland species. During the last millennia the effect of wild ungulates has

been replaced by domestic grazers and hay making, and the persistence of grassland biodiversity depends

on livestock farming. Local diversity is the outcome of colonisations and extinctions. Colonisations can

be enhanced by maintaining networks of grasslands where species can migrate between sites, and by

proper management that promotes establishment of new individuals. Extinction risk may be lowered in

large grasslands, which may support large populations, and by proper management that promotes

coexistence of species. Extinctions are accelerated by changes in environmental conditions favouring

a few competitively superior plant species, especially increase in soil fertility. During the last century,

natural grasslands in Europe have faced a dramatic loss of area and increased isolation of the remaining

fragments, cessation of proper management, and increased load of nutrients. To achieve successful

grassland biodiversity conservation there needs to be close cooperation between conservation managers

and livestock farmers. For that, grassland management should take into account evolutionary and

ecological rules behind the grassland biodiversity. (Less)
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Grassland Science in Europe
volume
10
pages
1 - 14
publisher
Grassland Science in Europe
ISBN
9985-9611-3-7
language
English
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yes
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81d611f2-b3e5-41af-bab3-f015049fae9d (old id 532202)
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http://www.planteco.lu.se/people/hhb/Partel_Bruun_Sammul_2005_Grassland_Science_in_Europe_10.pdf
date added to LUP
2007-09-24 14:58:43
date last changed
2016-04-16 07:50:22
@misc{81d611f2-b3e5-41af-bab3-f015049fae9d,
  abstract     = {Northern Europe is in the forest zone, but wild megaherbivores have maintained grass-dominated<br/><br>
vegetation here for the last 1.8 million years. Continuity of the grassland biome through glacialinterglacial<br/><br>
cycles and connection to steppe vegetation has resulted in the evolution, immigration, and<br/><br>
survival of a large number of grassland species. During the last millennia the effect of wild ungulates has<br/><br>
been replaced by domestic grazers and hay making, and the persistence of grassland biodiversity depends<br/><br>
on livestock farming. Local diversity is the outcome of colonisations and extinctions. Colonisations can<br/><br>
be enhanced by maintaining networks of grasslands where species can migrate between sites, and by<br/><br>
proper management that promotes establishment of new individuals. Extinction risk may be lowered in<br/><br>
large grasslands, which may support large populations, and by proper management that promotes<br/><br>
coexistence of species. Extinctions are accelerated by changes in environmental conditions favouring<br/><br>
a few competitively superior plant species, especially increase in soil fertility. During the last century,<br/><br>
natural grasslands in Europe have faced a dramatic loss of area and increased isolation of the remaining<br/><br>
fragments, cessation of proper management, and increased load of nutrients. To achieve successful<br/><br>
grassland biodiversity conservation there needs to be close cooperation between conservation managers<br/><br>
and livestock farmers. For that, grassland management should take into account evolutionary and<br/><br>
ecological rules behind the grassland biodiversity.},
  author       = {Pärtel, Meelis and Bruun, Hans Henrik and Sammul, Marek},
  isbn         = {9985-9611-3-7},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--14},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8d62bb0)},
  series       = {Grassland Science in Europe},
  title        = {Biodiversity in temperate European grasslands: origin and conservation.},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2005},
}