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Low-energy density and high fiber intake are dietary concerns in female endurance athletes.

Melin, Anna LU ; Tornberg, Åsa LU ; Skouby, S; Møller, S S; Faber, J; Sundgot-Borgen, J and Sjödin, A (2015) In Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports 26(9). p.1060-1071
Abstract
Low or reduced energy availability (LEA) is linked to functional hypothalamic oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea (FHA), which is frequently reported in weight-sensitive sports. This makes LEA a major nutritional concern for female athletes. The aim of this study was to describe dietary characteristics of athletes with LEA and/or FHA. Endurance athletes (n = 45) were recruited from national teams and competitive clubs. Protocols included gynecological examination, body composition, eating disorder evaluation, and 7-day dietary intake and EA assessment. Athletes with disordered eating behavior/eating disorders (n = 11), menstrual dysfunction other than FHA (n = 5), and low dietary record validity (n = 4) were excluded. Remaining subjects (n = 25)... (More)
Low or reduced energy availability (LEA) is linked to functional hypothalamic oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea (FHA), which is frequently reported in weight-sensitive sports. This makes LEA a major nutritional concern for female athletes. The aim of this study was to describe dietary characteristics of athletes with LEA and/or FHA. Endurance athletes (n = 45) were recruited from national teams and competitive clubs. Protocols included gynecological examination, body composition, eating disorder evaluation, and 7-day dietary intake and EA assessment. Athletes with disordered eating behavior/eating disorders (n = 11), menstrual dysfunction other than FHA (n = 5), and low dietary record validity (n = 4) were excluded. Remaining subjects (n = 25) were characterized by EA [optimal: ≥ 45 kcal (188 kJ)/kg fat-free mass (FFM)/day (n = 11), LEA: < 45 kcal (188 kJ)/kg FFM/day (n = 14)] and reproductive function [eumenorrhea (EUM; n = 10), FHA (n = 15)]. There was no difference in EA between FHA and EUM subjects. However, FHA and LEA subjects shared the same dietary characteristics of lower energy density (ED) [(P = 0.012; P = 0.020), respectively], and fat content [(P = 0.047; P = 0.027), respectively]. Furthermore, FHA subjects had a lower intake of carbohydrate-rich foods (P = 0.019), higher fiber content (P < 0.001), and drive for thinness score (P = 0.003). Conclusively, low ED together with high fiber content may constitute targets for dietary intervention in order to prevent and treat LEA and FHA in female athletes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
volume
26
issue
9
pages
1060 - 1071
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • PMID:26148242
  • Scopus:84935138072
ISSN
1600-0838
DOI
10.1111/sms.12516
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7356694a-8c70-455c-a05c-58620aba0d7f (old id 7750319)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26148242?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-08-06 23:42:59
date last changed
2016-11-14 12:48:11
@misc{7356694a-8c70-455c-a05c-58620aba0d7f,
  abstract     = {Low or reduced energy availability (LEA) is linked to functional hypothalamic oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea (FHA), which is frequently reported in weight-sensitive sports. This makes LEA a major nutritional concern for female athletes. The aim of this study was to describe dietary characteristics of athletes with LEA and/or FHA. Endurance athletes (n = 45) were recruited from national teams and competitive clubs. Protocols included gynecological examination, body composition, eating disorder evaluation, and 7-day dietary intake and EA assessment. Athletes with disordered eating behavior/eating disorders (n = 11), menstrual dysfunction other than FHA (n = 5), and low dietary record validity (n = 4) were excluded. Remaining subjects (n = 25) were characterized by EA [optimal: ≥ 45 kcal (188 kJ)/kg fat-free mass (FFM)/day (n = 11), LEA: &lt; 45 kcal (188 kJ)/kg FFM/day (n = 14)] and reproductive function [eumenorrhea (EUM; n = 10), FHA (n = 15)]. There was no difference in EA between FHA and EUM subjects. However, FHA and LEA subjects shared the same dietary characteristics of lower energy density (ED) [(P = 0.012; P = 0.020), respectively], and fat content [(P = 0.047; P = 0.027), respectively]. Furthermore, FHA subjects had a lower intake of carbohydrate-rich foods (P = 0.019), higher fiber content (P &lt; 0.001), and drive for thinness score (P = 0.003). Conclusively, low ED together with high fiber content may constitute targets for dietary intervention in order to prevent and treat LEA and FHA in female athletes.},
  author       = {Melin, Anna and Tornberg, Åsa and Skouby, S and Møller, S S and Faber, J and Sundgot-Borgen, J and Sjödin, A},
  issn         = {1600-0838},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1060--1071},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x91fdb00)},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports},
  title        = {Low-energy density and high fiber intake are dietary concerns in female endurance athletes.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.12516},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2015},
}