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Familial and hereditary prostate cancer in southern Sweden. A population-based case-control study

Bratt, O LU ; Kristoffersson, U LU ; Lundgren, R and Olsson, Håkan LU (1999) In European Journal of Cancer 35(2). p.7-272
Abstract

The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of family history on prostate cancer risk, to estimate the incidence of hereditary prostate cancer in southern Sweden and to assess the reliability of self-reported family history of prostate cancer. The study included consecutive prostate cancer patients and age-matched control subjects from a geographically defined population. The controls consisted of 1 male patient with malignant melanoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 1 male from the community per prostate cancer case. Family history was assessed with questionnaires, and diagnoses of fathers and brothers of cases were validated by the Southern Swedish Regional Tumour Registry. Among fathers and brothers whose names and... (More)

The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of family history on prostate cancer risk, to estimate the incidence of hereditary prostate cancer in southern Sweden and to assess the reliability of self-reported family history of prostate cancer. The study included consecutive prostate cancer patients and age-matched control subjects from a geographically defined population. The controls consisted of 1 male patient with malignant melanoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 1 male from the community per prostate cancer case. Family history was assessed with questionnaires, and diagnoses of fathers and brothers of cases were validated by the Southern Swedish Regional Tumour Registry. Among fathers and brothers whose names and birth dates were available, 56 (92%) of the 61 reported prostate cancer diagnoses were verified. Fifteen per cent of 356 cases and 5.0% of 712 controls reported at least 1 case of prostate cancer among their brothers or fathers, giving a relative risk of 3.2 (95% confidence interval 2.1-5.1). The relative risk increased with decreasing age at diagnosis of the patient. Based on the pedigree, 3.1% of the 356 patients were classified as having hereditary prostate cancer. This proportion was significantly higher among patients diagnosed before the age of 60 years (7.1%) than among older patients (2.2%). We conclude that there is a substantially increased risk of prostate cancer for sons and brothers of prostate cancer patients. The risk increases with decreasing age at diagnosis of the patient as an effect of a higher prevalence of hereditary prostate among early onset cases. Furthermore, we found self-reported family history of prostate cancer to be a valid estimate of the true incidence of prostate cancer in fathers and brothers of men with prostate cancer.

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organization
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Case-Control Studies, Family Health, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Pedigree, Prostatic Neoplasms, Self Disclosure, Sweden
in
European Journal of Cancer
volume
35
issue
2
pages
6 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0033083190
ISSN
0959-8049
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e51ce3d5-2468-4c65-aeed-372610e09408
date added to LUP
2016-09-18 12:32:28
date last changed
2016-10-13 05:13:43
@misc{e51ce3d5-2468-4c65-aeed-372610e09408,
  abstract     = {<p>The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of family history on prostate cancer risk, to estimate the incidence of hereditary prostate cancer in southern Sweden and to assess the reliability of self-reported family history of prostate cancer. The study included consecutive prostate cancer patients and age-matched control subjects from a geographically defined population. The controls consisted of 1 male patient with malignant melanoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 1 male from the community per prostate cancer case. Family history was assessed with questionnaires, and diagnoses of fathers and brothers of cases were validated by the Southern Swedish Regional Tumour Registry. Among fathers and brothers whose names and birth dates were available, 56 (92%) of the 61 reported prostate cancer diagnoses were verified. Fifteen per cent of 356 cases and 5.0% of 712 controls reported at least 1 case of prostate cancer among their brothers or fathers, giving a relative risk of 3.2 (95% confidence interval 2.1-5.1). The relative risk increased with decreasing age at diagnosis of the patient. Based on the pedigree, 3.1% of the 356 patients were classified as having hereditary prostate cancer. This proportion was significantly higher among patients diagnosed before the age of 60 years (7.1%) than among older patients (2.2%). We conclude that there is a substantially increased risk of prostate cancer for sons and brothers of prostate cancer patients. The risk increases with decreasing age at diagnosis of the patient as an effect of a higher prevalence of hereditary prostate among early onset cases. Furthermore, we found self-reported family history of prostate cancer to be a valid estimate of the true incidence of prostate cancer in fathers and brothers of men with prostate cancer.</p>},
  author       = {Bratt, O and Kristoffersson, U and Lundgren, R and Olsson, Håkan},
  issn         = {0959-8049},
  keyword      = {Adult,Aged,Aged, 80 and over,Case-Control Studies,Family Health,Genetic Predisposition to Disease,Humans,Incidence,Male,Middle Aged,Pedigree,Prostatic Neoplasms,Self Disclosure,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {7--272},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9d47a60)},
  series       = {European Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Familial and hereditary prostate cancer in southern Sweden. A population-based case-control study},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {1999},
}