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Parents in adult psychiatric care and their children : a call for more interagency collaboration with social services and child and adolescent psychiatry

Afzelius, Maria; Östman, Margareta LU ; Råstam, Maria LU and Priebe, Gisela LU (2017) In Nordic Journal of Psychiatry p.1-8
Abstract

Background: A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support. Aim: To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration. Methods: Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients’ main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions. Results: Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were... (More)

Background: A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support. Aim: To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration. Methods: Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients’ main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions. Results: Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were involved in interagency collaboration as compared to 7.7% without child-focused interventions. Overall, collaboration with child and adolescent psychiatric services was low for all main diagnoses. If a patient received child-focused interventions from psychiatric services, the likelihood of being involved in interagency collaboration was five times greater as compared to patients receiving no child-focused intervention when controlled for gender, main diagnosis, and inpatient care. Conclusions: Psychiatric services play a significant role in identifying the need for and initiating child-focused interventions in families with a parental mental illness, and need to develop and support strategies to enhance interagency collaboration with other welfare services.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
in press
subject
keywords
child-focused intervention, children, interagency collaboration, Parental mental illness, psychiatric services
in
Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
pages
1 - 8
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • scopus:85029677558
  • wos:000417846400005
ISSN
0803-9488
DOI
10.1080/08039488.2017.1377287
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
01574eda-9558-47a1-a1e1-0cc7fc211ed5
date added to LUP
2017-10-10 16:22:25
date last changed
2018-01-16 13:22:48
@article{01574eda-9558-47a1-a1e1-0cc7fc211ed5,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support. Aim: To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration. Methods: Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients’ main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions. Results: Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were involved in interagency collaboration as compared to 7.7% without child-focused interventions. Overall, collaboration with child and adolescent psychiatric services was low for all main diagnoses. If a patient received child-focused interventions from psychiatric services, the likelihood of being involved in interagency collaboration was five times greater as compared to patients receiving no child-focused intervention when controlled for gender, main diagnosis, and inpatient care. Conclusions: Psychiatric services play a significant role in identifying the need for and initiating child-focused interventions in families with a parental mental illness, and need to develop and support strategies to enhance interagency collaboration with other welfare services.</p>},
  author       = {Afzelius, Maria and Östman, Margareta and Råstam, Maria and Priebe, Gisela},
  issn         = {0803-9488},
  keyword      = {child-focused intervention,children,interagency collaboration,Parental mental illness,psychiatric services},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  pages        = {1--8},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Nordic Journal of Psychiatry},
  title        = {Parents in adult psychiatric care and their children : a call for more interagency collaboration with social services and child and adolescent psychiatry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039488.2017.1377287},
  year         = {2017},
}