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In situ pneumococcal vaccine production and delivery through a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector

Li, Yi; Beitelshees, Marie; Fang, Lei; Hill, Andrew; Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Chen, Mingfu; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul; Smith, Randall J and Andreadis, Stelios T, et al. (2016) In Science advances 2(7).
Abstract

The type and potency of an immune response provoked during vaccination will determine ultimate success in disease prevention. The basis for this response will be the design and implementation of antigen presentation to the immune system. Whereas direct antigen administration will elicit some form of immunological response, a more sophisticated approach would couple the antigen of interest to a vector capable of broad delivery formats and designed for heightened response. New antigens associated with pneumococcal disease virulence were used to test the delivery and adjuvant capabilities of a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector consisting of a bacterial core electrostatically coated with a cationic polymer. The hybrid design provides (i)... (More)

The type and potency of an immune response provoked during vaccination will determine ultimate success in disease prevention. The basis for this response will be the design and implementation of antigen presentation to the immune system. Whereas direct antigen administration will elicit some form of immunological response, a more sophisticated approach would couple the antigen of interest to a vector capable of broad delivery formats and designed for heightened response. New antigens associated with pneumococcal disease virulence were used to test the delivery and adjuvant capabilities of a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector consisting of a bacterial core electrostatically coated with a cationic polymer. The hybrid design provides (i) passive and active targeting of antigen-presenting cells, (ii) natural and multicomponent adjuvant properties, (iii) dual intracellular delivery mechanisms, and (iv) a simple formulation mechanism. In addition, the hybrid format enables device-specific, or in situ, antigen production and consolidation via localization within the bacterial component of the vector. This capability eliminates the need for dedicated antigen production and purification before vaccination efforts while leveraging the aforementioned features of the overall delivery device. We present the first disease-specific utilization of the vector toward pneumococcal disease highlighted by improved immune responses and protective capabilities when tested against traditional vaccine formulations and a range of clinically relevant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. More broadly, the results point to similar levels of success with other diseases that would benefit from the production, delivery, and efficacy capabilities offered by the hybrid vector.

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Journal Article
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Science advances
volume
2
issue
7
publisher
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
external identifiers
  • wos:000381805300023
  • scopus:84980487971
ISSN
2375-2548
DOI
10.1126/sciadv.1600264
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English
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yes
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02c0a1ff-1f79-46f4-b4d7-6ffff45155f9
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2016-09-25 01:18:36
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2017-07-02 04:54:25
@article{02c0a1ff-1f79-46f4-b4d7-6ffff45155f9,
  abstract     = {<p>The type and potency of an immune response provoked during vaccination will determine ultimate success in disease prevention. The basis for this response will be the design and implementation of antigen presentation to the immune system. Whereas direct antigen administration will elicit some form of immunological response, a more sophisticated approach would couple the antigen of interest to a vector capable of broad delivery formats and designed for heightened response. New antigens associated with pneumococcal disease virulence were used to test the delivery and adjuvant capabilities of a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector consisting of a bacterial core electrostatically coated with a cationic polymer. The hybrid design provides (i) passive and active targeting of antigen-presenting cells, (ii) natural and multicomponent adjuvant properties, (iii) dual intracellular delivery mechanisms, and (iv) a simple formulation mechanism. In addition, the hybrid format enables device-specific, or in situ, antigen production and consolidation via localization within the bacterial component of the vector. This capability eliminates the need for dedicated antigen production and purification before vaccination efforts while leveraging the aforementioned features of the overall delivery device. We present the first disease-specific utilization of the vector toward pneumococcal disease highlighted by improved immune responses and protective capabilities when tested against traditional vaccine formulations and a range of clinically relevant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. More broadly, the results point to similar levels of success with other diseases that would benefit from the production, delivery, and efficacy capabilities offered by the hybrid vector.</p>},
  articleno    = {e1600264},
  author       = {Li, Yi and Beitelshees, Marie and Fang, Lei and Hill, Andrew and Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal and Chen, Mingfu and Davidson, Bruce A and Knight, Paul and Smith, Randall J and Andreadis, Stelios T and Hakansson, Anders P and Jones, Charles H and Pfeifer, Blaine A},
  issn         = {2375-2548},
  keyword      = {Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  publisher    = {American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)},
  series       = {Science advances},
  title        = {In situ pneumococcal vaccine production and delivery through a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1600264},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2016},
}