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What is the role of CRP in glioblastoma?

Förnvik, Karolina LU ; Maddahi, Aida LU ; Liljedahl, Emma LU ; Osther, Kurt LU ; Salford, Leif G. LU and Redebrandt, Henrietta Nittby LU (2021) In Cancer Treatment and Research Communications 26.
Abstract

Background: Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. Previous studies have suggested that CRP (C-reactive protein) could serve as a biomarker candidate as well as a prognostic factor in glioblastoma patients, and we here further investigate its potential role. Materials and methods: Publicly available datasets were used to compare gene expression between brain samples from glioblastoma patients and non-tumor tissue. The structure of CRP was compared between humans and rats. Glioblastoma cells from humans and rats were stained with anti-CRP. Fischer 344 rats were inoculated with syngeneic glioblastoma cells pre-coated with anti-CRP, and survival was monitored. CRP concentration in rats carrying... (More)

Background: Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. Previous studies have suggested that CRP (C-reactive protein) could serve as a biomarker candidate as well as a prognostic factor in glioblastoma patients, and we here further investigate its potential role. Materials and methods: Publicly available datasets were used to compare gene expression between brain samples from glioblastoma patients and non-tumor tissue. The structure of CRP was compared between humans and rats. Glioblastoma cells from humans and rats were stained with anti-CRP. Fischer 344 rats were inoculated with syngeneic glioblastoma cells pre-coated with anti-CRP, and survival was monitored. CRP concentration in rats carrying glioblastoma was followed. Results: CRP was upregulated on one locus on gene level in glioblastoma tissue as compared to non-tumor brain tissue, but not in glioma stem cells as compared to neural stem cells. The structure of the CRP protein was a characteristic pentamer in both humans and rats. Both human and rat glioblastoma cells were clearly positive for anti-CRP staining. Pre-coating of glioblastoma cells with anti-CRP antibodies did not affect survival in rats with intracranial tumors. Serum levels of CRP increased during tumor progression but did not reach significantly different levels. Conclusions: Both human and rat glioblastoma cells could be stained with anti-CRP antibodies in vitro. In a syngeneic glioblastoma rat model we could see an increase in serum CRP during tumor progression, but coating glioblastoma cells with anti-CRP antibodies did not provide any survival change for the animals.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
C-reactive protein, CRP, Glioblastoma, High grade glioma
in
Cancer Treatment and Research Communications
volume
26
article number
100293
publisher
Elsevier Ltd
external identifiers
  • pmid:33385735
  • scopus:85098621799
ISSN
2468-2942
DOI
10.1016/j.ctarc.2020.100293
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
034ab892-d4ef-4ac3-af95-d30591f3d990
date added to LUP
2021-01-14 07:50:07
date last changed
2021-06-16 02:15:15
@article{034ab892-d4ef-4ac3-af95-d30591f3d990,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. Previous studies have suggested that CRP (C-reactive protein) could serve as a biomarker candidate as well as a prognostic factor in glioblastoma patients, and we here further investigate its potential role. Materials and methods: Publicly available datasets were used to compare gene expression between brain samples from glioblastoma patients and non-tumor tissue. The structure of CRP was compared between humans and rats. Glioblastoma cells from humans and rats were stained with anti-CRP. Fischer 344 rats were inoculated with syngeneic glioblastoma cells pre-coated with anti-CRP, and survival was monitored. CRP concentration in rats carrying glioblastoma was followed. Results: CRP was upregulated on one locus on gene level in glioblastoma tissue as compared to non-tumor brain tissue, but not in glioma stem cells as compared to neural stem cells. The structure of the CRP protein was a characteristic pentamer in both humans and rats. Both human and rat glioblastoma cells were clearly positive for anti-CRP staining. Pre-coating of glioblastoma cells with anti-CRP antibodies did not affect survival in rats with intracranial tumors. Serum levels of CRP increased during tumor progression but did not reach significantly different levels. Conclusions: Both human and rat glioblastoma cells could be stained with anti-CRP antibodies in vitro. In a syngeneic glioblastoma rat model we could see an increase in serum CRP during tumor progression, but coating glioblastoma cells with anti-CRP antibodies did not provide any survival change for the animals.</p>},
  author       = {Förnvik, Karolina and Maddahi, Aida and Liljedahl, Emma and Osther, Kurt and Salford, Leif G. and Redebrandt, Henrietta Nittby},
  issn         = {2468-2942},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Ltd},
  series       = {Cancer Treatment and Research Communications},
  title        = {What is the role of CRP in glioblastoma?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctarc.2020.100293},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.ctarc.2020.100293},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2021},
}