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Can Phytophthora quercina have a negative impact on mature pedunculate oaks under field conditions?

Jönsson Belyazid, Ulrika LU and Rosengren, Ulrika LU (2006) In Annals of Forest Science 63(7). p.661-672
Abstract
Ten oak stands in southern Sweden were investigated to evaluate the impact of the root pathogen Phytophthora quercina on mature oaks under field conditions. Phytophthora quercina was present in five of the stands, while the other five stands were used as controls to verify the effect of the pathogen. In each stand, a healthy, a moderately declining and a severely declining tree were sampled. Fine-root length and nutrient status of each tree were analyzed, and the chemistry of the soil surrounding each tree was determined. The results showed that P. quercina can cause substantial reductions in the fine-root length of mature trees under natural conditions. The impact of the pathogen varied depending on tree vitality and season, being most... (More)
Ten oak stands in southern Sweden were investigated to evaluate the impact of the root pathogen Phytophthora quercina on mature oaks under field conditions. Phytophthora quercina was present in five of the stands, while the other five stands were used as controls to verify the effect of the pathogen. In each stand, a healthy, a moderately declining and a severely declining tree were sampled. Fine-root length and nutrient status of each tree were analyzed, and the chemistry of the soil surrounding each tree was determined. The results showed that P. quercina can cause substantial reductions in the fine-root length of mature trees under natural conditions. The impact of the pathogen varied depending on tree vitality and season, being most pronounced for declining trees after an unusually dry summer. Despite the significant reduction in live fine-root length of declining trees in Phytophthora-infested stands, no consistent effects were found on the nutrient status of trees. Based on the significant impact of the pathogen on the fine-root systems of declining trees, we suggest that P. quercina contribute to oak decline in southern Sweden at the sites where it is present. No explanation is currently available for the decline of trees in non-infested stands, but the lack of symptoms of root damage indicate, together with the extensive root growth of declining trees, that root pathogens are not involved in the decline at these sites. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Forest Science
volume
63
issue
7
pages
661 - 672
publisher
EDP Sciences
external identifiers
  • wos:000241381500002
  • scopus:33751535847
ISSN
1286-4560
DOI
10.1051/forest:2006047
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Plant Ecology and Systematics (Closed 2011) (011004000)
id
0356c0a8-2b41-4cdb-8aab-a4320752ed7f (old id 162801)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:45:22
date last changed
2020-01-12 08:32:43
@article{0356c0a8-2b41-4cdb-8aab-a4320752ed7f,
  abstract     = {Ten oak stands in southern Sweden were investigated to evaluate the impact of the root pathogen Phytophthora quercina on mature oaks under field conditions. Phytophthora quercina was present in five of the stands, while the other five stands were used as controls to verify the effect of the pathogen. In each stand, a healthy, a moderately declining and a severely declining tree were sampled. Fine-root length and nutrient status of each tree were analyzed, and the chemistry of the soil surrounding each tree was determined. The results showed that P. quercina can cause substantial reductions in the fine-root length of mature trees under natural conditions. The impact of the pathogen varied depending on tree vitality and season, being most pronounced for declining trees after an unusually dry summer. Despite the significant reduction in live fine-root length of declining trees in Phytophthora-infested stands, no consistent effects were found on the nutrient status of trees. Based on the significant impact of the pathogen on the fine-root systems of declining trees, we suggest that P. quercina contribute to oak decline in southern Sweden at the sites where it is present. No explanation is currently available for the decline of trees in non-infested stands, but the lack of symptoms of root damage indicate, together with the extensive root growth of declining trees, that root pathogens are not involved in the decline at these sites.},
  author       = {Jönsson Belyazid, Ulrika and Rosengren, Ulrika},
  issn         = {1286-4560},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {661--672},
  publisher    = {EDP Sciences},
  series       = {Annals of Forest Science},
  title        = {Can Phytophthora quercina have a negative impact on mature pedunculate oaks under field conditions?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/forest:2006047},
  doi          = {10.1051/forest:2006047},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2006},
}