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Physical exercise is associated with beneficial bone mineral density and body composition in young adults with childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease

Sigurdsson, Gudmundur Vignir ; Schmidt, Susanne ; Mellström, Dan ; Ohlsson, Claes ; Karlsson, Magnus LU ; Lorentzon, Mattias and Saalman, Robert (2021) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 56(6). p.699-707
Abstract

Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of compromised bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition. There are limited data on the physical exercise (PE) habits of patients with childhood-onset IBD and on the associations between PE and BMD and body composition. Patients and methods: In total, 72 young adults with childhood-onset IBD and 1341 normative young adult controls answered questionnaires regarding PE [hours/week (h/w)] in the last 12 months. BMD and body composition were measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and presented as age- and gender-adjusted Z-scores for BMD, skeletal muscle index (SMI, the weight of lean mass in arms and legs/m2), and percentage body fat... (More)

Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of compromised bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition. There are limited data on the physical exercise (PE) habits of patients with childhood-onset IBD and on the associations between PE and BMD and body composition. Patients and methods: In total, 72 young adults with childhood-onset IBD and 1341 normative young adult controls answered questionnaires regarding PE [hours/week (h/w)] in the last 12 months. BMD and body composition were measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and presented as age- and gender-adjusted Z-scores for BMD, skeletal muscle index (SMI, the weight of lean mass in arms and legs/m2), and percentage body fat (Fat %). Results: A total of 41 (57%) patients with IBD engaged in PE during the previous 12 months, as compared to 913 (68%) of the controls (p =.053). Sedentary patients had significantly lower median BMD, SMI, and Fat % Z-scores than the controls with corresponding PE habits (all p <.05). In contrast, highly active (>4 h/week) patients had total body BMD, SMI, and Fat % in the same range as the controls with corresponding PE levels (p =.151, p =.992, and p =.189, respectively), albeit with lower BMDs in the spine (p =.007) and femoral neck (p =.015). Using multiple regression analyses, a diagnosis of childhood-onset IBD was independently associated with inferior BMD and body composition, regardless of the amount of PE. Conclusion: Physical exercise is associated with beneficial bone mineral density and body composition in patients with IBD despite the negative effects of the disease.

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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Inflammatory bowel disease bone mineral density body composition skeletal muscle, physical activity
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
56
issue
6
pages
9 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85105197196
  • pmid:33945377
ISSN
0036-5521
DOI
10.1080/00365521.2021.1913759
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0502c811-3384-4aea-a07a-c342ba3f2398
date added to LUP
2021-05-31 15:18:36
date last changed
2022-05-24 06:33:56
@article{0502c811-3384-4aea-a07a-c342ba3f2398,
  abstract     = {{<p>Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of compromised bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition. There are limited data on the physical exercise (PE) habits of patients with childhood-onset IBD and on the associations between PE and BMD and body composition. Patients and methods: In total, 72 young adults with childhood-onset IBD and 1341 normative young adult controls answered questionnaires regarding PE [hours/week (h/w)] in the last 12 months. BMD and body composition were measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and presented as age- and gender-adjusted Z-scores for BMD, skeletal muscle index (SMI, the weight of lean mass in arms and legs/m<sup>2</sup>), and percentage body fat (Fat %). Results: A total of 41 (57%) patients with IBD engaged in PE during the previous 12 months, as compared to 913 (68%) of the controls (p =.053). Sedentary patients had significantly lower median BMD, SMI, and Fat % Z-scores than the controls with corresponding PE habits (all p &lt;.05). In contrast, highly active (&gt;4 h/week) patients had total body BMD, SMI, and Fat % in the same range as the controls with corresponding PE levels (p =.151, p =.992, and p =.189, respectively), albeit with lower BMDs in the spine (p =.007) and femoral neck (p =.015). Using multiple regression analyses, a diagnosis of childhood-onset IBD was independently associated with inferior BMD and body composition, regardless of the amount of PE. Conclusion: Physical exercise is associated with beneficial bone mineral density and body composition in patients with IBD despite the negative effects of the disease.</p>}},
  author       = {{Sigurdsson, Gudmundur Vignir and Schmidt, Susanne and Mellström, Dan and Ohlsson, Claes and Karlsson, Magnus and Lorentzon, Mattias and Saalman, Robert}},
  issn         = {{0036-5521}},
  keywords     = {{Inflammatory bowel disease bone mineral density body composition skeletal muscle; physical activity}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{6}},
  pages        = {{699--707}},
  publisher    = {{Taylor & Francis}},
  series       = {{Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology}},
  title        = {{Physical exercise is associated with beneficial bone mineral density and body composition in young adults with childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365521.2021.1913759}},
  doi          = {{10.1080/00365521.2021.1913759}},
  volume       = {{56}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}