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The Paradox of Progress : the Emergence of Wage Discrimination in US Manufacturing

Burnette, Joyce LU (2015) In European Review of Economic History 19(2). p.128-148
Abstract
This article tests for wage discrimination in US manufacturing during the nineteenth century and in 2002 by estimating the female-to-male productivity ratio and comparing it to the wage ratio. This method will not identify all forms of discrimination, but will determine whether women were paid wages commensurate with their productivity. There was no significant difference between the wage ratio and the productivity ratio in the nineteenth century, but in 1900 there is evidence of gender discrimination among white-collar workers. In 2002 the female-to-male productivity ratio was higher than in the nineteenth century, and the wage ratio was also higher, but the wage ratio was significantly lower than the productivity ratio, at least for... (More)
This article tests for wage discrimination in US manufacturing during the nineteenth century and in 2002 by estimating the female-to-male productivity ratio and comparing it to the wage ratio. This method will not identify all forms of discrimination, but will determine whether women were paid wages commensurate with their productivity. There was no significant difference between the wage ratio and the productivity ratio in the nineteenth century, but in 1900 there is evidence of gender discrimination among white-collar workers. In 2002 the female-to-male productivity ratio was higher than in the nineteenth century, and the wage ratio was also higher, but the wage ratio was significantly lower than the productivity ratio, at least for workers older than thirty-five. The movement from the spot labor markets of the nineteenth century to the internal labor markets has allowed for the emergence of gender wage discrimination. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
wage discrimination, gender wage gap
in
European Review of Economic History
volume
19
issue
2
pages
21 pages
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:84929720793
ISSN
1474-0044
DOI
10.1093/ereh/hev002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
07e68eac-76aa-45f7-af66-a1a34e5bc152
date added to LUP
2017-09-15 13:38:52
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:01:24
@article{07e68eac-76aa-45f7-af66-a1a34e5bc152,
  abstract     = {This article tests for wage discrimination in US manufacturing during the nineteenth century and in 2002 by estimating the female-to-male productivity ratio and comparing it to the wage ratio. This method will not identify all forms of discrimination, but will determine whether women were paid wages commensurate with their productivity. There was no significant difference between the wage ratio and the productivity ratio in the nineteenth century, but in 1900 there is evidence of gender discrimination among white-collar workers. In 2002 the female-to-male productivity ratio was higher than in the nineteenth century, and the wage ratio was also higher, but the wage ratio was significantly lower than the productivity ratio, at least for workers older than thirty-five. The movement from the spot labor markets of the nineteenth century to the internal labor markets has allowed for the emergence of gender wage discrimination.},
  author       = {Burnette, Joyce},
  issn         = {1474-0044},
  keyword      = {wage discrimination,gender wage gap},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {128--148},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {European Review of Economic History},
  title        = {The Paradox of Progress : the Emergence of Wage Discrimination in US Manufacturing},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ereh/hev002},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2015},
}