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Arthritis management in primary care - A study of physiotherapists' current practice, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines

Andersson, Siv Folkhammar; Bergman, Stefan LU ; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin and Bremander, Ann LU (2016) In Musculoskeletal Care
Abstract

Background: With an increasing number of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in primary care, our aim was to investigate arthritis-related practice in physiotherapy and to study adherence to evidence-based care. Methods: Seventy physiotherapists (PTs) working in primary care were emailed a questionnaire to investigate current practice and the number of roles assumed by PTs, the degree of confidence, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines in managing patients with OA or RA. Interventions supported by national guidelines were compared with reports of treatment modalities in the questionnaire. Results: Sixty-four (91%) PTs responded, and they reported a higher degree of confidence in assessment,... (More)

Background: With an increasing number of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in primary care, our aim was to investigate arthritis-related practice in physiotherapy and to study adherence to evidence-based care. Methods: Seventy physiotherapists (PTs) working in primary care were emailed a questionnaire to investigate current practice and the number of roles assumed by PTs, the degree of confidence, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines in managing patients with OA or RA. Interventions supported by national guidelines were compared with reports of treatment modalities in the questionnaire. Results: Sixty-four (91%) PTs responded, and they reported a higher degree of confidence in assessment, treatment and education of patients with OA than for those with RA (p < 0.001). The total number of roles assumed by the PTs was higher in the management of OA than for RA (p < 0.001). PTs who assumed a greater number of roles also reported a stronger degree of confidence in assessing OA (p = 0.036). Those who assumed fewer roles also reported less confidence in RA treatment (p = 0.045). Recommendations in the guidelines were followed by the majority of PTs for eight of 11 treatment modalities in OA and for six of six in RA. Conclusions: PTs reported a lower degree of confidence and the assumption of fewer roles in managing patients with RA compared with OA. There was good adherence to the national guidelines for almost all the treatment modalities listed. Even so, the results indicate a need for education, especially in chronic inflammatory arthritis care.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Evidence-based practice, Osteoarthritis, Physiotherapy, Rheumatoid arthritis
in
Musculoskeletal Care
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85007341847
ISSN
1478-2189
DOI
10.1002/msc.1176
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
082bda1f-2b18-496b-ab23-b237ae736a40
date added to LUP
2017-01-20 14:09:12
date last changed
2017-11-14 13:29:12
@article{082bda1f-2b18-496b-ab23-b237ae736a40,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: With an increasing number of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in primary care, our aim was to investigate arthritis-related practice in physiotherapy and to study adherence to evidence-based care. Methods: Seventy physiotherapists (PTs) working in primary care were emailed a questionnaire to investigate current practice and the number of roles assumed by PTs, the degree of confidence, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines in managing patients with OA or RA. Interventions supported by national guidelines were compared with reports of treatment modalities in the questionnaire. Results: Sixty-four (91%) PTs responded, and they reported a higher degree of confidence in assessment, treatment and education of patients with OA than for those with RA (p &lt; 0.001). The total number of roles assumed by the PTs was higher in the management of OA than for RA (p &lt; 0.001). PTs who assumed a greater number of roles also reported a stronger degree of confidence in assessing OA (p = 0.036). Those who assumed fewer roles also reported less confidence in RA treatment (p = 0.045). Recommendations in the guidelines were followed by the majority of PTs for eight of 11 treatment modalities in OA and for six of six in RA. Conclusions: PTs reported a lower degree of confidence and the assumption of fewer roles in managing patients with RA compared with OA. There was good adherence to the national guidelines for almost all the treatment modalities listed. Even so, the results indicate a need for education, especially in chronic inflammatory arthritis care.</p>},
  author       = {Andersson, Siv Folkhammar and Bergman, Stefan and Henriksson, Elisabet Welin and Bremander, Ann},
  issn         = {1478-2189},
  keyword      = {Evidence-based practice,Osteoarthritis,Physiotherapy,Rheumatoid arthritis},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Musculoskeletal Care},
  title        = {Arthritis management in primary care - A study of physiotherapists' current practice, educational needs and adherence to national guidelines},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/msc.1176},
  year         = {2016},
}