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Plasma stem cell factor levels are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease and death

Björkbacka, H LU ; Yao Mattisson, I LU ; Wigren, M LU ; Melander, O LU ; Fredrikson, G. N. LU ; Bengtsson, E LU ; Gonçalves, I LU ; Almgren, P LU ; Lagerstedt, J. O. LU and Orho-Melander, M LU , et al. (2017) In Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00 282(6). p.508-521
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Stem cell factor (SCF) is a key growth factor for several types of stem and progenitor cells. There is experimental evidence that such cells are of importance for maintaining the integrity of the cardiovascular system. We investigated the association between circulating levels of SCF and risk for development of cardiovascular events and death.

METHODS: SCF was analysed by the proximity extension assay technique in plasma from 4742 subjects participating in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Cardiovascular events and death were monitored through national registers with a mean follow-up time of 19.2 years.

RESULTS: Subjects with high baseline levels of SCF had lower cardiovascular (n = 340) and all-cause mortality (n... (More)

OBJECTIVE: Stem cell factor (SCF) is a key growth factor for several types of stem and progenitor cells. There is experimental evidence that such cells are of importance for maintaining the integrity of the cardiovascular system. We investigated the association between circulating levels of SCF and risk for development of cardiovascular events and death.

METHODS: SCF was analysed by the proximity extension assay technique in plasma from 4742 subjects participating in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Cardiovascular events and death were monitored through national registers with a mean follow-up time of 19.2 years.

RESULTS: Subjects with high baseline levels of SCF had lower cardiovascular (n = 340) and all-cause mortality (n = 1159) as well as a lower risk of heart failure (n = 177), stroke (n = 318) and myocardial infarction (n = 452). Smoking, diabetes and high alcohol consumption were associated with lower levels of SCF. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene region encoding PDX1 C-terminal inhibiting factor 1 (PCIF1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were associated with plasma SCF levels. The highest SCF quartile remained independently associated with a lower risk of a lower risk of cardiovascular [hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval 0.59 (0.43-0.81)] and all-cause mortality [0.68 (0.57-0.81)], heart failure [0.50 (0.31-0.80)] and stroke [0.66 (0.47-0.92)], but not with MI [0.96 (0.72-1.27)] as compared with the lowest quartile when adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors in Cox proportional hazard regression models.

CONCLUSIONS: This prospective population-based study demonstrates that subjects with high levels of SCF have a lower risk of cardiovascular events and death. The findings provide clinical support for a protective role of SCF in maintaining cardiovascular integrity.

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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
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Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00
volume
282
issue
6
pages
508 - 521
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85034436112
ISSN
1365-2796
DOI
10.1111/joim.12675
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
08340a2c-4c95-4e06-95a6-ae3979146aea
date added to LUP
2017-10-19 20:08:35
date last changed
2017-12-12 07:17:44
@article{08340a2c-4c95-4e06-95a6-ae3979146aea,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE: Stem cell factor (SCF) is a key growth factor for several types of stem and progenitor cells. There is experimental evidence that such cells are of importance for maintaining the integrity of the cardiovascular system. We investigated the association between circulating levels of SCF and risk for development of cardiovascular events and death.</p><p>METHODS: SCF was analysed by the proximity extension assay technique in plasma from 4742 subjects participating in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Cardiovascular events and death were monitored through national registers with a mean follow-up time of 19.2 years.</p><p>RESULTS: Subjects with high baseline levels of SCF had lower cardiovascular (n = 340) and all-cause mortality (n = 1159) as well as a lower risk of heart failure (n = 177), stroke (n = 318) and myocardial infarction (n = 452). Smoking, diabetes and high alcohol consumption were associated with lower levels of SCF. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene region encoding PDX1 C-terminal inhibiting factor 1 (PCIF1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were associated with plasma SCF levels. The highest SCF quartile remained independently associated with a lower risk of a lower risk of cardiovascular [hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval 0.59 (0.43-0.81)] and all-cause mortality [0.68 (0.57-0.81)], heart failure [0.50 (0.31-0.80)] and stroke [0.66 (0.47-0.92)], but not with MI [0.96 (0.72-1.27)] as compared with the lowest quartile when adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors in Cox proportional hazard regression models.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: This prospective population-based study demonstrates that subjects with high levels of SCF have a lower risk of cardiovascular events and death. The findings provide clinical support for a protective role of SCF in maintaining cardiovascular integrity.</p>},
  author       = {Björkbacka, H and Yao Mattisson, I and Wigren, M and Melander, O and Fredrikson, G. N. and Bengtsson, E and Gonçalves, I and Almgren, P and Lagerstedt, J. O. and Orho-Melander, M and Engström, G and Nilsson, J.},
  issn         = {1365-2796},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {508--521},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Plasma stem cell factor levels are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease and death},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joim.12675},
  volume       = {282},
  year         = {2017},
}