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Perceived social status among people with psychiatric disabilities attending work-oriented and meeting place-oriented day centers

Tjörnstrand, Carina LU ; Argentzell, Elisabeth LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2016) In Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation 55(1). p.19-28
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Day centers have been criticized for giving attendees a lower social status because they only offer activities that are often work-like although not financially of benefit to attendees. OBJECTIVES: To explore day center attendees' perceived social status and to identify associations among the attendees with the center's orientation with activity, well-being, and psychiatric symptoms. METHOD: Day center attendees in meeting place-oriented (n = 39) and work-oriented (n = 54) day centers in Sweden were interviewed addressing the targeted factors using both self-rated and interview-based instruments. RESULT: Attendees rated themselves close to the middle on the social status measure. No difference between groups based on day... (More)

BACKGROUND: Day centers have been criticized for giving attendees a lower social status because they only offer activities that are often work-like although not financially of benefit to attendees. OBJECTIVES: To explore day center attendees' perceived social status and to identify associations among the attendees with the center's orientation with activity, well-being, and psychiatric symptoms. METHOD: Day center attendees in meeting place-oriented (n = 39) and work-oriented (n = 54) day centers in Sweden were interviewed addressing the targeted factors using both self-rated and interview-based instruments. RESULT: Attendees rated themselves close to the middle on the social status measure. No difference between groups based on day center orientation was found. Their self-perceived positioning on social status was positively related to the worker role, occupational engagement, self-rated health, self-esteem, self-mastery, and depressive symptoms. Logistic regression models showed better self-rated health was the only predictor of belonging to the group with a higher level of social status when dichotomized according to the median. Self-rated health was the strongest indicator for scoring above the 75th percentile on perceived status, followed by self-esteem, which was also a significant indicator. CONCLUSION: These findings yielded new knowledge concerning perceived social status in the target group and the importance of health and self-esteem.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
community mental health, Health, occupational engagement, occupational therapy, social capital
in
Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation
volume
55
issue
1
pages
10 pages
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:84989339680
  • wos:000386411100004
ISSN
1051-9815
DOI
10.3233/WOR-162388
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0a18a88c-2b51-4d69-9880-448d584edc6e
date added to LUP
2016-11-03 15:35:21
date last changed
2017-04-24 10:48:41
@article{0a18a88c-2b51-4d69-9880-448d584edc6e,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Day centers have been criticized for giving attendees a lower social status because they only offer activities that are often work-like although not financially of benefit to attendees. OBJECTIVES: To explore day center attendees' perceived social status and to identify associations among the attendees with the center's orientation with activity, well-being, and psychiatric symptoms. METHOD: Day center attendees in meeting place-oriented (n = 39) and work-oriented (n = 54) day centers in Sweden were interviewed addressing the targeted factors using both self-rated and interview-based instruments. RESULT: Attendees rated themselves close to the middle on the social status measure. No difference between groups based on day center orientation was found. Their self-perceived positioning on social status was positively related to the worker role, occupational engagement, self-rated health, self-esteem, self-mastery, and depressive symptoms. Logistic regression models showed better self-rated health was the only predictor of belonging to the group with a higher level of social status when dichotomized according to the median. Self-rated health was the strongest indicator for scoring above the 75th percentile on perceived status, followed by self-esteem, which was also a significant indicator. CONCLUSION: These findings yielded new knowledge concerning perceived social status in the target group and the importance of health and self-esteem.</p>},
  author       = {Tjörnstrand, Carina and Argentzell, Elisabeth and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {1051-9815},
  keyword      = {community mental health,Health,occupational engagement,occupational therapy,social capital},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {19--28},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Perceived social status among people with psychiatric disabilities attending work-oriented and meeting place-oriented day centers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/WOR-162388},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2016},
}