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Lessons from basic pancreatic beta cell research in type-2 diabetes and vascular complications

Eliasson, Lena LU ; Esguerra, Jonathan Lou S. LU and Wendt, Anna LU (2017) In Diabetology International 8(2). p.139-152
Abstract
The changes in life-style with increased access of food and reduced physical activity have resulted in the global epidemic of obesity. Consequently, individuals with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease have also escalated. A central organ in the development of diabetes is the pancreas, and more specifically the pancreatic beta cells within the islets of Langerhans. Beta cells have been assigned the important task of secreting insulin when blood glucose is increased to lower the glucose level. An early sign of diabetes pathogenesis is lack of first phase insulin response and reduced second phase secretion. In this review, which is based on the foreign investigator award lecture given at the JSDC meeting in Sendai in October 2016, we... (More)
The changes in life-style with increased access of food and reduced physical activity have resulted in the global epidemic of obesity. Consequently, individuals with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease have also escalated. A central organ in the development of diabetes is the pancreas, and more specifically the pancreatic beta cells within the islets of Langerhans. Beta cells have been assigned the important task of secreting insulin when blood glucose is increased to lower the glucose level. An early sign of diabetes pathogenesis is lack of first phase insulin response and reduced second phase secretion. In this review, which is based on the foreign investigator award lecture given at the JSDC meeting in Sendai in October 2016, we discuss a possible cellular explanation for the reduced first phase insulin response and how this can be influenced by lipids. Moreover, since patients with cardiovascular disease and high levels of cholesterol are often treated with statins, we summarize recent data regarding effects on statins on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. Finally, we suggest microRNAs (miRNAs) as central players in the adjustment of beta cell function during the development of diabetes. We specifically discuss miRNAs regarding their involvement in insulin secretion regulation, differential expression in type 2 diabetes, and potential as biomarkers for prediction of diabetes and cardiovascular complications. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
MicroRNA, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, Pancreatic beta cell, Insulin secretion, Obesity, Statins
in
Diabetology International
volume
8
issue
2
pages
139 - 152
publisher
Springer Japan
external identifiers
  • scopus:85019704436
  • wos:000405699500003
ISSN
2190-1686
DOI
10.1007/s13340-017-0304-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0c553c42-00c1-4c66-9fff-fbf33eaa0856
date added to LUP
2017-01-30 09:14:24
date last changed
2018-03-18 05:08:51
@article{0c553c42-00c1-4c66-9fff-fbf33eaa0856,
  abstract     = {The changes in life-style with increased access of food and reduced physical activity have resulted in the global epidemic of obesity. Consequently, individuals with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease have also escalated. A central organ in the development of diabetes is the pancreas, and more specifically the pancreatic beta cells within the islets of Langerhans. Beta cells have been assigned the important task of secreting insulin when blood glucose is increased to lower the glucose level. An early sign of diabetes pathogenesis is lack of first phase insulin response and reduced second phase secretion. In this review, which is based on the foreign investigator award lecture given at the JSDC meeting in Sendai in October 2016, we discuss a possible cellular explanation for the reduced first phase insulin response and how this can be influenced by lipids. Moreover, since patients with cardiovascular disease and high levels of cholesterol are often treated with statins, we summarize recent data regarding effects on statins on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. Finally, we suggest microRNAs (miRNAs) as central players in the adjustment of beta cell function during the development of diabetes. We specifically discuss miRNAs regarding their involvement in insulin secretion regulation, differential expression in type 2 diabetes, and potential as biomarkers for prediction of diabetes and cardiovascular complications.},
  author       = {Eliasson, Lena and Esguerra, Jonathan Lou S. and Wendt, Anna},
  issn         = {2190-1686},
  keyword      = {MicroRNA,Type 2 diabetes mellitus,Pancreatic beta cell,Insulin secretion,Obesity,Statins},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {139--152},
  publisher    = {Springer Japan},
  series       = {Diabetology International},
  title        = {Lessons from basic pancreatic beta cell research in type-2 diabetes and vascular complications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13340-017-0304-4},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2017},
}