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Time on timing : Dissociating premature responding from interval sensitivity in Parkinson's disease

Zhang, Jiaxiang; Nombela, Cristina; Wolpe, Noham; Barker, Roger A LU and Rowe, James B (2016) In Movement Disorders 31(8). p.72-1163
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) can cause impulsivity with premature responses, but there are several potential mechanisms. We proposed a distinction between poor decision-making and the distortion of temporal perception. Both effects may be present and interact, but with different clinical and pharmacological correlates.

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed premature responding during time perception in PD.

METHODS: In this study, 18 PD patients and 19 age-matched controls completed 2 temporal discrimination tasks (bisection and trisection) and a baseline reaction-time task. Timing sensitivity and decision-making processes were quantified by response and response time. An extended version of the modified difference model... (More)

BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) can cause impulsivity with premature responses, but there are several potential mechanisms. We proposed a distinction between poor decision-making and the distortion of temporal perception. Both effects may be present and interact, but with different clinical and pharmacological correlates.

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed premature responding during time perception in PD.

METHODS: In this study, 18 PD patients and 19 age-matched controls completed 2 temporal discrimination tasks (bisection and trisection) and a baseline reaction-time task. Timing sensitivity and decision-making processes were quantified by response and response time. An extended version of the modified difference model was used to examine the precision of time representation and the modulation of response time by stimulus ambiguity.

RESULTS: In the bisection task, patients had a lower bisection point (P < .05) and reduced timing sensitivity when compared with controls (P < .001). In the trisection task, patients showed lower sensitivity in discriminating between short and medium standards (P < .05). The impairment in timing sensitivity correlated positively with patients' levodopa dose equivalent (P < .05). Critically, patients had disproportionately faster response times when compared with controls in more ambiguous conditions, and the degree of acceleration of response time increased with disease severity (P < .05). Computational modeling indicated that patients had poorer precision in time representation and stronger modulation of response time by task ambiguity, leading to smaller scaling of the decision latency (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that timing deficits in PD cannot be solely attributed to perceptual distortions, but are also associated with impulsive decision strategies that bias patients toward premature responses. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Journal Article
in
Movement Disorders
volume
31
issue
8
pages
10 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:84964374743
ISSN
0885-3185
DOI
10.1002/mds.26631
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
0d1b0a8a-cc8f-4f21-ad12-77ee0d60f902
date added to LUP
2016-11-23 13:09:24
date last changed
2017-08-06 05:13:54
@article{0d1b0a8a-cc8f-4f21-ad12-77ee0d60f902,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) can cause impulsivity with premature responses, but there are several potential mechanisms. We proposed a distinction between poor decision-making and the distortion of temporal perception. Both effects may be present and interact, but with different clinical and pharmacological correlates.</p><p>OBJECTIVES: This study assessed premature responding during time perception in PD.</p><p>METHODS: In this study, 18 PD patients and 19 age-matched controls completed 2 temporal discrimination tasks (bisection and trisection) and a baseline reaction-time task. Timing sensitivity and decision-making processes were quantified by response and response time. An extended version of the modified difference model was used to examine the precision of time representation and the modulation of response time by stimulus ambiguity.</p><p>RESULTS: In the bisection task, patients had a lower bisection point (P &lt; .05) and reduced timing sensitivity when compared with controls (P &lt; .001). In the trisection task, patients showed lower sensitivity in discriminating between short and medium standards (P &lt; .05). The impairment in timing sensitivity correlated positively with patients' levodopa dose equivalent (P &lt; .05). Critically, patients had disproportionately faster response times when compared with controls in more ambiguous conditions, and the degree of acceleration of response time increased with disease severity (P &lt; .05). Computational modeling indicated that patients had poorer precision in time representation and stronger modulation of response time by task ambiguity, leading to smaller scaling of the decision latency (P &lt; .05).</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that timing deficits in PD cannot be solely attributed to perceptual distortions, but are also associated with impulsive decision strategies that bias patients toward premature responses. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.</p>},
  author       = {Zhang, Jiaxiang and Nombela, Cristina and Wolpe, Noham and Barker, Roger A and Rowe, James B},
  issn         = {0885-3185},
  keyword      = {Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {72--1163},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Movement Disorders},
  title        = {Time on timing : Dissociating premature responding from interval sensitivity in Parkinson's disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.26631},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2016},
}