Advanced

From cell death to neuronal regeneration : building a new brain after traumatic brain injury

Royo, Nicolas C; Schouten, Joost W; Fulp, Carl T; Shimizu, Saori; Marklund, Niklas LU ; Graham, David I and McIntosh, Tracy K (2003) In American Journal of Psychotherapy 62(8). p.11-801
Abstract

During the past decade, there has been accumulating evidence of the involvement of passive and active cell death mechanisms in both the clinical setting and in experimental models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Traditionally, research for a treatment of TBI consists of strategies to prevent cell death using acute pharmacological therapy. However, to date, encouraging experimental work has not been translated into successful clinical trials. The development of cell replacement therapies may offer an alternative or a complementary strategy for the treatment of TBI. Recent experimental studies have identified a variety of candidate cell lines for transplantation into the injured CNS. Additionally, the characterization of the neurogenic... (More)

During the past decade, there has been accumulating evidence of the involvement of passive and active cell death mechanisms in both the clinical setting and in experimental models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Traditionally, research for a treatment of TBI consists of strategies to prevent cell death using acute pharmacological therapy. However, to date, encouraging experimental work has not been translated into successful clinical trials. The development of cell replacement therapies may offer an alternative or a complementary strategy for the treatment of TBI. Recent experimental studies have identified a variety of candidate cell lines for transplantation into the injured CNS. Additionally, the characterization of the neurogenic potential of specific regions of the adult mammalian brain and the elucidation of the molecular controls underlying regeneration may allow for the development of neuronal replacement therapies that do not require transplantation of exogenous cells. These novel strategies may represent a new opportunity of great interest for delayed intervention in patients with TBI.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Animals, Brain Injuries, Cell Death, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Nerve Regeneration, Staining and Labeling, Transplantation, Journal Article, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S., Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S., Review
in
American Journal of Psychotherapy
volume
62
issue
8
pages
11 - 801
publisher
American Association of Neuropathologists
external identifiers
  • scopus:0041833614
ISSN
0022-3069
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
0d57067e-c4ef-4d95-bda7-a740fb11e72e
date added to LUP
2018-03-03 12:50:08
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:36:21
@article{0d57067e-c4ef-4d95-bda7-a740fb11e72e,
  abstract     = {<p>During the past decade, there has been accumulating evidence of the involvement of passive and active cell death mechanisms in both the clinical setting and in experimental models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Traditionally, research for a treatment of TBI consists of strategies to prevent cell death using acute pharmacological therapy. However, to date, encouraging experimental work has not been translated into successful clinical trials. The development of cell replacement therapies may offer an alternative or a complementary strategy for the treatment of TBI. Recent experimental studies have identified a variety of candidate cell lines for transplantation into the injured CNS. Additionally, the characterization of the neurogenic potential of specific regions of the adult mammalian brain and the elucidation of the molecular controls underlying regeneration may allow for the development of neuronal replacement therapies that do not require transplantation of exogenous cells. These novel strategies may represent a new opportunity of great interest for delayed intervention in patients with TBI.</p>},
  author       = {Royo, Nicolas C and Schouten, Joost W and Fulp, Carl T and Shimizu, Saori and Marklund, Niklas and Graham, David I and McIntosh, Tracy K},
  issn         = {0022-3069},
  keyword      = {Animals,Brain Injuries,Cell Death,Disease Models, Animal,Humans,In Situ Nick-End Labeling,Nerve Regeneration,Staining and Labeling,Transplantation,Journal Article,Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.,Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.,Review},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {11--801},
  publisher    = {American Association of Neuropathologists},
  series       = {American Journal of Psychotherapy},
  title        = {From cell death to neuronal regeneration : building a new brain after traumatic brain injury},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2003},
}