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Stuck at a workplace : What’s work control, demands and learning got to do with it? A longitudinal multilevel study on Swedish permanent employees in situations of ‘workplace locked-in’

Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia; Stengård, Johanna; Leineweber, Constanze; Westerlund, Hugo; Peristera, Paraskevi and Östergren, P. O. LU (2018) In International Journal of Human Resource Management
Abstract

Whilst health consequences of being locked-in at the workplace have been documented in several research studies, it is largely unknown how work characteristics and their changes over time relate to risks for becoming locked-in at a certain workplace. Accordingly, this paper studied how perceived control, learning opportunities and quantitative demands at work associate with workplace-locked-in (WPLI). The study included permanent employees who participated in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) study in wave 3 through 5 (n = 2918 individuals; n = 7460 observations). Results from multi-level analysis show that there was significant individual variation in WPLI changes over time, even though on average, WPLI... (More)

Whilst health consequences of being locked-in at the workplace have been documented in several research studies, it is largely unknown how work characteristics and their changes over time relate to risks for becoming locked-in at a certain workplace. Accordingly, this paper studied how perceived control, learning opportunities and quantitative demands at work associate with workplace-locked-in (WPLI). The study included permanent employees who participated in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) study in wave 3 through 5 (n = 2918 individuals; n = 7460 observations). Results from multi-level analysis show that there was significant individual variation in WPLI changes over time, even though on average, WPLI decreased slightly. Differences in work characteristics between individuals (L2) and across time (L1) associated significantly with WPLI: higher levels of job control and learning opportunities related to lower odds ratios for WPLI, whereas higher quantitative job demands associated with higher odds ratios of WPLI. Moreover, differences in quantitative job demands, number of job changes and educational achievements explained the individual variations of WPLI developments over time. The result shows that WPLI can – to some extent – be prevented or reduced through good work design, and implications for HR managers and organizations are discussed.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
job changes, multilevel modelling, work characteristics, Workplace locked-in status
in
International Journal of Human Resource Management
pages
22 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85041615862
ISSN
0958-5192
DOI
10.1080/09585192.2017.1423101
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0d9f5ac4-62f0-43c8-a396-f2f35dfb80f0
date added to LUP
2018-02-21 11:53:39
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:13:45
@article{0d9f5ac4-62f0-43c8-a396-f2f35dfb80f0,
  abstract     = {<p>Whilst health consequences of being locked-in at the workplace have been documented in several research studies, it is largely unknown how work characteristics and their changes over time relate to risks for becoming locked-in at a certain workplace. Accordingly, this paper studied how perceived control, learning opportunities and quantitative demands at work associate with workplace-locked-in (WPLI). The study included permanent employees who participated in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) study in wave 3 through 5 (n = 2918 individuals; n = 7460 observations). Results from multi-level analysis show that there was significant individual variation in WPLI changes over time, even though on average, WPLI decreased slightly. Differences in work characteristics between individuals (L2) and across time (L1) associated significantly with WPLI: higher levels of job control and learning opportunities related to lower odds ratios for WPLI, whereas higher quantitative job demands associated with higher odds ratios of WPLI. Moreover, differences in quantitative job demands, number of job changes and educational achievements explained the individual variations of WPLI developments over time. The result shows that WPLI can – to some extent – be prevented or reduced through good work design, and implications for HR managers and organizations are discussed.</p>},
  author       = {Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia and Stengård, Johanna and Leineweber, Constanze and Westerlund, Hugo and Peristera, Paraskevi and Östergren, P. O.},
  issn         = {0958-5192},
  keyword      = {job changes,multilevel modelling,work characteristics,Workplace locked-in status},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  pages        = {22},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {International Journal of Human Resource Management},
  title        = {Stuck at a workplace : What’s work control, demands and learning got to do with it? A longitudinal multilevel study on Swedish permanent employees in situations of ‘workplace locked-in’},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2017.1423101},
  year         = {2018},
}