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Polymer-Surfactant Interactions

Lindman, B. LU and Nylander, T. LU (2017) p.449-469
Abstract

Deposition from oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant (P/S) systems has numerous industrial applications such as detergency, paints, oil recovery, the pharmaceuticals, food, and biotechnology. Deposition is a delicate balance between the bulk-solution phase behavior of the system and the forces that control the interaction with the surface. Generally, maximum surface excess from polyelectrolyte surfactant mixtures coincides with this phase separation region, and this process is often kinetically controlled. We will discuss how the molecular properties of a range of polymers can be used to tune the properties. If the polymer is not hydrophobic enough, the surfactant binding is too limited to ensure attachment, whereas surfactant... (More)

Deposition from oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant (P/S) systems has numerous industrial applications such as detergency, paints, oil recovery, the pharmaceuticals, food, and biotechnology. Deposition is a delicate balance between the bulk-solution phase behavior of the system and the forces that control the interaction with the surface. Generally, maximum surface excess from polyelectrolyte surfactant mixtures coincides with this phase separation region, and this process is often kinetically controlled. We will discuss how the molecular properties of a range of polymers can be used to tune the properties. If the polymer is not hydrophobic enough, the surfactant binding is too limited to ensure attachment, whereas surfactant binding will be too strong and the phase separation range too limited if the polymer is too hydrophobic. No phase separation will occur if the charge density is too low, but a too-high charge density will cause so strong an association between surfactant and polymer that deposition does not occur. It is important to bear in mind that during the timescale of the application of a formulation, nonequilibrium effects can be significant and utilized to form a layer that is trapped in a nonequilibrium state, which gives the desired surface functionality.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adsorption, Associative phase separation, Gels, Hydrophobic interactions, Polymer-surfactant interaction, Surface deposition, Surfactants, Thickening, Water-soluble polymers
host publication
Cosmetic Science and Technology
pages
21 pages
publisher
Elsevier Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85040601582
ISBN
9780128020050
9780128020548
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-12-802005-0.00026-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0fc2d3a6-c335-4ef2-bc54-c1b476d2912a
date added to LUP
2018-01-31 08:02:12
date last changed
2019-04-23 04:26:18
@inbook{0fc2d3a6-c335-4ef2-bc54-c1b476d2912a,
  abstract     = {<p>Deposition from oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant (P/S) systems has numerous industrial applications such as detergency, paints, oil recovery, the pharmaceuticals, food, and biotechnology. Deposition is a delicate balance between the bulk-solution phase behavior of the system and the forces that control the interaction with the surface. Generally, maximum surface excess from polyelectrolyte surfactant mixtures coincides with this phase separation region, and this process is often kinetically controlled. We will discuss how the molecular properties of a range of polymers can be used to tune the properties. If the polymer is not hydrophobic enough, the surfactant binding is too limited to ensure attachment, whereas surfactant binding will be too strong and the phase separation range too limited if the polymer is too hydrophobic. No phase separation will occur if the charge density is too low, but a too-high charge density will cause so strong an association between surfactant and polymer that deposition does not occur. It is important to bear in mind that during the timescale of the application of a formulation, nonequilibrium effects can be significant and utilized to form a layer that is trapped in a nonequilibrium state, which gives the desired surface functionality.</p>},
  author       = {Lindman, B. and Nylander, T.},
  isbn         = {9780128020050},
  keyword      = {Adsorption,Associative phase separation,Gels,Hydrophobic interactions,Polymer-surfactant interaction,Surface deposition,Surfactants,Thickening,Water-soluble polymers},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  pages        = {449--469},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Inc.},
  title        = {Polymer-Surfactant Interactions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-802005-0.00026-4},
  year         = {2017},
}