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Your next of kin or your own career? Caring and working among the 50+ of Europe.

Bolin, Kristian LU ; Lindgren, Björn LU and Lundborg, Petter LU (2008) In Journal of Health Economics 27(3). p.718-738
Abstract
An increasing demand for both formal and informal care is likely to result from the ongoing demographic transition at the same time as there is a further move away from the traditional domestic division of labour. Public policy-making that aims at increasing the supply of informal care necessitates knowledge about the relative importance of various incentives for individual care providers. This paper takes as a point of departure that the willingness to supply informal care is partly explained by the extent to which it adversely affects labour-market outcomes and analyses the effect on labour-market outcomes of providing informal care to one's elderly parent(s) among the 50+ of Europe. Data from SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing, and... (More)
An increasing demand for both formal and informal care is likely to result from the ongoing demographic transition at the same time as there is a further move away from the traditional domestic division of labour. Public policy-making that aims at increasing the supply of informal care necessitates knowledge about the relative importance of various incentives for individual care providers. This paper takes as a point of departure that the willingness to supply informal care is partly explained by the extent to which it adversely affects labour-market outcomes and analyses the effect on labour-market outcomes of providing informal care to one's elderly parent(s) among the 50+ of Europe. Data from SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) was used to examine the association between, on the one hand, hours of informal care provided and, on the other, (1) the probability of employment, (2) hours worked, and (3) wages, respectively. The results suggest that giving informal care to one's elderly parents is associated with significant costs in terms of foregone labour-market opportunities and that these adverse effects vary between countries. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Health Economics
volume
27
issue
3
pages
718 - 738
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:18207265
  • wos:000256841800012
  • scopus:43549094488
ISSN
1879-1646
DOI
10.1016/j.jhealeco.2007.10.004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
324f6441-2603-497f-8d94-89c8285cc294 (old id 1021240)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18207265?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-02-07 13:35:26
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:37:29
@article{324f6441-2603-497f-8d94-89c8285cc294,
  abstract     = {An increasing demand for both formal and informal care is likely to result from the ongoing demographic transition at the same time as there is a further move away from the traditional domestic division of labour. Public policy-making that aims at increasing the supply of informal care necessitates knowledge about the relative importance of various incentives for individual care providers. This paper takes as a point of departure that the willingness to supply informal care is partly explained by the extent to which it adversely affects labour-market outcomes and analyses the effect on labour-market outcomes of providing informal care to one's elderly parent(s) among the 50+ of Europe. Data from SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) was used to examine the association between, on the one hand, hours of informal care provided and, on the other, (1) the probability of employment, (2) hours worked, and (3) wages, respectively. The results suggest that giving informal care to one's elderly parents is associated with significant costs in terms of foregone labour-market opportunities and that these adverse effects vary between countries.},
  author       = {Bolin, Kristian and Lindgren, Björn and Lundborg, Petter},
  issn         = {1879-1646},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {718--738},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Health Economics},
  title        = {Your next of kin or your own career? Caring and working among the 50+ of Europe.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhealeco.2007.10.004},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2008},
}