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Progressive resistance training after stroke: Effects on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation.

Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt LU ; Miller, Michael LU ; Downham, David and Lexell, Jan LU (2008) In Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine 40(1). p.42-48
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation after stroke. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial. SUBJECTS: Twenty-four subjects (mean age 61 years (standard deviation 5)) 6-48 months post-stroke. METHODS: The training group (n = 15) participated in supervised progressive resistance training of the knee muscles (80% of maximum) twice weekly for 10 weeks, and the control group (n = 9) continued their usual daily activities. Both groups were assessed before and after the intervention and at follow-up after 5 months. Muscle strength was evaluated dynamically and isokinetically (60 degrees /sec) and muscle tone by the Modified Ashworth Scale.... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation after stroke. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial. SUBJECTS: Twenty-four subjects (mean age 61 years (standard deviation 5)) 6-48 months post-stroke. METHODS: The training group (n = 15) participated in supervised progressive resistance training of the knee muscles (80% of maximum) twice weekly for 10 weeks, and the control group (n = 9) continued their usual daily activities. Both groups were assessed before and after the intervention and at follow-up after 5 months. Muscle strength was evaluated dynamically and isokinetically (60 degrees /sec) and muscle tone by the Modified Ashworth Scale. Gait performance was evaluated by Timed "Up & Go", Fast Gait Speed and 6-Minute Walk tests, and perceived participation by Stroke Impact Scale. RESULTS: Muscle strength increased significantly after progressive resistance training with no increase in muscle tone and improvements were maintained at follow-up. Both groups improved in gait performance, but at follow-up only Timed "Up & Go" and perceived participation were significantly better for the training group. CONCLUSIONS: Progressive resistance training is an effective intervention to improve muscle strength in chronic stroke. There appear to be long-term benefits, but further studies are needed to clarify the effects, specifically of progressive resistance training on gait performance and participation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
volume
40
issue
1
pages
42 - 48
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • PMID:18176736
  • WOS:000252744500007
  • Scopus:38849199741
ISSN
1651-2081
DOI
10.2340/16501977-0129
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
962092e3-7528-43b3-9a8c-fb1537fe3ada (old id 1021620)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18176736?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-02-08 15:44:28
date last changed
2017-02-19 04:25:01
@article{962092e3-7528-43b3-9a8c-fb1537fe3ada,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation after stroke. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial. SUBJECTS: Twenty-four subjects (mean age 61 years (standard deviation 5)) 6-48 months post-stroke. METHODS: The training group (n = 15) participated in supervised progressive resistance training of the knee muscles (80% of maximum) twice weekly for 10 weeks, and the control group (n = 9) continued their usual daily activities. Both groups were assessed before and after the intervention and at follow-up after 5 months. Muscle strength was evaluated dynamically and isokinetically (60 degrees /sec) and muscle tone by the Modified Ashworth Scale. Gait performance was evaluated by Timed "Up & Go", Fast Gait Speed and 6-Minute Walk tests, and perceived participation by Stroke Impact Scale. RESULTS: Muscle strength increased significantly after progressive resistance training with no increase in muscle tone and improvements were maintained at follow-up. Both groups improved in gait performance, but at follow-up only Timed "Up & Go" and perceived participation were significantly better for the training group. CONCLUSIONS: Progressive resistance training is an effective intervention to improve muscle strength in chronic stroke. There appear to be long-term benefits, but further studies are needed to clarify the effects, specifically of progressive resistance training on gait performance and participation.},
  author       = {Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt and Miller, Michael and Downham, David and Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {1651-2081},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {42--48},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine},
  title        = {Progressive resistance training after stroke: Effects on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-0129},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2008},
}