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Longitudinal follow-up of children born preterm: cognitive development at age 19

Tideman, Eva LU (2000) In Early Human Development 58(2). p.81-90
Abstract
In a long-term prospective study, 39 preterm children born before 35 completed weeks of gestation and 23 full-term children were followed up at 4, 9 and 19 years of age. Psychometric evaluation of the cognitive development at 4 years of age showed that the preterms fell within the normal range, although their performance was inferior to that of the full-terms. This difference between the groups was not found at 9 and 19 years of age. Within the preterm group there was no correlation between the test results and birthweight, gestational age, prenatal or perinatal optimality scores. Full-terms had better scholastic performance at the end of compulsory schooling, while there was no difference at 19 years of age. At 19 years of age, about 1/3... (More)
In a long-term prospective study, 39 preterm children born before 35 completed weeks of gestation and 23 full-term children were followed up at 4, 9 and 19 years of age. Psychometric evaluation of the cognitive development at 4 years of age showed that the preterms fell within the normal range, although their performance was inferior to that of the full-terms. This difference between the groups was not found at 9 and 19 years of age. Within the preterm group there was no correlation between the test results and birthweight, gestational age, prenatal or perinatal optimality scores. Full-terms had better scholastic performance at the end of compulsory schooling, while there was no difference at 19 years of age. At 19 years of age, about 1/3 of the children in both groups rated themselves as having had attention deficits during their childhood and adolescence. In this group of moderately immature, low-risk children, preterm birth without major physical or mental disabilities poses a developmental risk that seems to have the greatest impact during the preschool years and then gradually attenuates. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Scholastic performance, Attention, Preterm children, Cognitive development, Long-term outcome
in
Early Human Development
volume
58
issue
2
pages
81 - 90
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0034077672
ISSN
1872-6232
DOI
10.1016/S0378-3782(00)00055-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e8d131c7-50f4-4efa-bcdc-fdb49d22677b (old id 1025699)
date added to LUP
2008-02-05 16:29:07
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:28:51
@article{e8d131c7-50f4-4efa-bcdc-fdb49d22677b,
  abstract     = {In a long-term prospective study, 39 preterm children born before 35 completed weeks of gestation and 23 full-term children were followed up at 4, 9 and 19 years of age. Psychometric evaluation of the cognitive development at 4 years of age showed that the preterms fell within the normal range, although their performance was inferior to that of the full-terms. This difference between the groups was not found at 9 and 19 years of age. Within the preterm group there was no correlation between the test results and birthweight, gestational age, prenatal or perinatal optimality scores. Full-terms had better scholastic performance at the end of compulsory schooling, while there was no difference at 19 years of age. At 19 years of age, about 1/3 of the children in both groups rated themselves as having had attention deficits during their childhood and adolescence. In this group of moderately immature, low-risk children, preterm birth without major physical or mental disabilities poses a developmental risk that seems to have the greatest impact during the preschool years and then gradually attenuates.},
  author       = {Tideman, Eva},
  issn         = {1872-6232},
  keyword      = {Scholastic performance,Attention,Preterm children,Cognitive development,Long-term outcome},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {81--90},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Early Human Development},
  title        = {Longitudinal follow-up of children born preterm: cognitive development at age 19},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0378-3782(00)00055-4},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2000},
}