Advanced

Normalized motor function but impaired sensory function after unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury: patients compared with uninjured controls.

Ageberg, Eva LU and Fridén, Thomas LU (2008) In Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy 16. p.449-456
Abstract
Improvement in motor function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is achieved by appropriate rehabilitation. However, it has been questioned whether training after injury can lead to sensory improvement. We hypothesized that motor function can be restored after unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury, whereas the sensory function cannot, i.e., there would be no difference in functional performance or knee muscle strength between subjects with ACL injury and uninjured controls, but the subjects with ACL injury would have poorer kinesthesia than the uninjured controls. This is a Cross-Sectional Study, wherein 56 (20 women and 36 men) individuals with unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury were assessed at a mean of 15 years (SD... (More)
Improvement in motor function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is achieved by appropriate rehabilitation. However, it has been questioned whether training after injury can lead to sensory improvement. We hypothesized that motor function can be restored after unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury, whereas the sensory function cannot, i.e., there would be no difference in functional performance or knee muscle strength between subjects with ACL injury and uninjured controls, but the subjects with ACL injury would have poorer kinesthesia than the uninjured controls. This is a Cross-Sectional Study, wherein 56 (20 women and 36 men) individuals with unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury were assessed at a mean of 15 years (SD 1.4 years) after the initial injury. All patients initially underwent rehabilitation and were advised to modify their activity level, in order to cope with the ACL insufficiency. At 15 years, they had good subjective function and acceptable activity level. Twenty-eight (14 women and 14 men) uninjured subjects served as controls. Patients and controls were assessed with the one-leg hop test for distance, isometric and isokinetic knee muscle strength, and kinesthesia (the threshold to detection of passive motion). The individuals with ACL injury had the same or better functional performance, measured by the one-leg hop test for distance, and knee muscle strength compared with the uninjured controls. Kinesthesia was poorer in the patient group than in the control group. The results indicate that motor function can be restored but that the sensory function is persistently disturbed after ACL injury. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
volume
16
pages
449 - 456
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:18305924
  • wos:000256153500004
  • scopus:43049165961
ISSN
1433-7347
DOI
10.1007/s00167-008-0499-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f51f7233-ea00-4c0c-a12a-79322c7815d1 (old id 1041438)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18305924?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-03-03 11:35:54
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:44:35
@article{f51f7233-ea00-4c0c-a12a-79322c7815d1,
  abstract     = {Improvement in motor function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is achieved by appropriate rehabilitation. However, it has been questioned whether training after injury can lead to sensory improvement. We hypothesized that motor function can be restored after unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury, whereas the sensory function cannot, i.e., there would be no difference in functional performance or knee muscle strength between subjects with ACL injury and uninjured controls, but the subjects with ACL injury would have poorer kinesthesia than the uninjured controls. This is a Cross-Sectional Study, wherein 56 (20 women and 36 men) individuals with unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury were assessed at a mean of 15 years (SD 1.4 years) after the initial injury. All patients initially underwent rehabilitation and were advised to modify their activity level, in order to cope with the ACL insufficiency. At 15 years, they had good subjective function and acceptable activity level. Twenty-eight (14 women and 14 men) uninjured subjects served as controls. Patients and controls were assessed with the one-leg hop test for distance, isometric and isokinetic knee muscle strength, and kinesthesia (the threshold to detection of passive motion). The individuals with ACL injury had the same or better functional performance, measured by the one-leg hop test for distance, and knee muscle strength compared with the uninjured controls. Kinesthesia was poorer in the patient group than in the control group. The results indicate that motor function can be restored but that the sensory function is persistently disturbed after ACL injury.},
  author       = {Ageberg, Eva and Fridén, Thomas},
  issn         = {1433-7347},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {449--456},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy},
  title        = {Normalized motor function but impaired sensory function after unilateral non-reconstructed ACL injury: patients compared with uninjured controls.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-008-0499-9},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2008},
}