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Costs for screening, intervention and hospital treatment generated by the Malmö Preventive Project: a large-scale community screening programme.

Norinder, A; Persson, U; Nilsson, P; Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU ; Hedblad, Bo LU and Berglund, Göran LU (2002) In Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00 251(1). p.44-52
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to estimate retrospectively the costs of health care resources used in the Malmö Preventive Project, Sweden and estimate the costs of in-patient care that were avoided because of early intervention. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: A large-scale community intervention programme was conducted from 1974 to 1992 in Malmö, Sweden with the aim of reducing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), alcohol related illnesses, and breast cancer. Between 1974 and 1992, 33 336 male and female subjects were screened for hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, type-2 diabetes and alcohol abuse. Intervention programmes that included life-style modifications, follow-up visits with physicians and nurses and drug... (More)
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to estimate retrospectively the costs of health care resources used in the Malmö Preventive Project, Sweden and estimate the costs of in-patient care that were avoided because of early intervention. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: A large-scale community intervention programme was conducted from 1974 to 1992 in Malmö, Sweden with the aim of reducing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), alcohol related illnesses, and breast cancer. Between 1974 and 1992, 33 336 male and female subjects were screened for hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, type-2 diabetes and alcohol abuse. Intervention programmes that included life-style modifications, follow-up visits with physicians and nurses and drug therapy were offered to about 25% of screened subjects. METHODS: Recruitment costs were generated through out the screening period. Intervention costs were estimated for 5 years after screening. Excess in-patient care costs were estimated by subtracting hospital consumption for an unscreened, matched cohort from that of the screened cohort over follow-up periods of 13-19 years. Intervention and excess in-patient care costs were estimated until 1996. RESULTS: The net expenditures for recruitment and intervention was SEK253 million and saved costs for in-patient care of SEK143 millions (1998 prices). Considering the opportunity cost of the resources used in the study, the net cost rises to about SEK200 millions. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that only part of the intervention costs were offset by reduction in future morbidity health care costs. This is in line with results from prospective analyses of other primary prevention programmes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Health Care Costs
in
Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00
volume
251
issue
1
pages
44 - 52
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000173204400005
  • pmid:11851864
  • scopus:0036197816
ISSN
1365-2796
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2796.2002.00923.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
52a173b4-d69e-4433-acc1-2a8ce590de5d (old id 105922)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11851864&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-27 12:07:33
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:44:01
@article{52a173b4-d69e-4433-acc1-2a8ce590de5d,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to estimate retrospectively the costs of health care resources used in the Malmö Preventive Project, Sweden and estimate the costs of in-patient care that were avoided because of early intervention. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: A large-scale community intervention programme was conducted from 1974 to 1992 in Malmö, Sweden with the aim of reducing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), alcohol related illnesses, and breast cancer. Between 1974 and 1992, 33 336 male and female subjects were screened for hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, type-2 diabetes and alcohol abuse. Intervention programmes that included life-style modifications, follow-up visits with physicians and nurses and drug therapy were offered to about 25% of screened subjects. METHODS: Recruitment costs were generated through out the screening period. Intervention costs were estimated for 5 years after screening. Excess in-patient care costs were estimated by subtracting hospital consumption for an unscreened, matched cohort from that of the screened cohort over follow-up periods of 13-19 years. Intervention and excess in-patient care costs were estimated until 1996. RESULTS: The net expenditures for recruitment and intervention was SEK253 million and saved costs for in-patient care of SEK143 millions (1998 prices). Considering the opportunity cost of the resources used in the study, the net cost rises to about SEK200 millions. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that only part of the intervention costs were offset by reduction in future morbidity health care costs. This is in line with results from prospective analyses of other primary prevention programmes.},
  author       = {Norinder, A and Persson, U and Nilsson, P and Nilsson, Jan-Åke and Hedblad, Bo and Berglund, Göran},
  issn         = {1365-2796},
  keyword      = {Health Care Costs},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {44--52},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine1989-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Costs for screening, intervention and hospital treatment generated by the Malmö Preventive Project: a large-scale community screening programme.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2796.2002.00923.x},
  volume       = {251},
  year         = {2002},
}