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Selection of antibodies based on antibody kinetic binding properties.

Malmborg Hager, Ann-Christin LU ; Nilsson, Nina and Ohlin, Mats LU (2002) In Methods in Molecular Biology 178. p.53-245
Abstract
Molecular evolution approaches to developing molecules with characteristics particularly suited for specific applications have become important tools in biomedicine and biotechnology. Not only is it possible to identify molecules with specificities that cannot easily be obtained by other means, but it is also possible to fine-tune in an efficient manner the properties for, in principle, any specified application. Attention has particularly been put into identifying molecules with specific reaction-rate and affinity properties. Depending on the intended application, the binding of a molecule to its target is desired to be long-lived or short-lived. In biosensors, it will generally be appropriate for the association between the ligand and... (More)
Molecular evolution approaches to developing molecules with characteristics particularly suited for specific applications have become important tools in biomedicine and biotechnology. Not only is it possible to identify molecules with specificities that cannot easily be obtained by other means, but it is also possible to fine-tune in an efficient manner the properties for, in principle, any specified application. Attention has particularly been put into identifying molecules with specific reaction-rate and affinity properties. Depending on the intended application, the binding of a molecule to its target is desired to be long-lived or short-lived. In biosensors, it will generally be appropriate for the association between the ligand and its receptor to be rapid. However, the dissociation of the complex should also be fast to ensure a rapid response of the sensor to a changing environment, particularly in on-line systems. In contrast, stable, nondissociating interactions are favored when, for example, an antibody (Ab) is used for tumor imaging or tumor therapy. In conventional immunoassays, high affinity (and specificity) is often sought to ensure a high sensitivity of the assay. However, under conditions in which a high throughput rather than a highly sensitive format is necessary, it may be more important to have a rapid association rate and a rapid establishment of equilibrium of the assay system than simply to have an assay based on high affinity alone. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Methods in Molecular Biology
volume
178
pages
53 - 245
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:0036365680
ISSN
1940-6029
DOI
10.1385/1-59259-240-6:245
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e287dc93-ab9c-4109-b974-e058e6bba448 (old id 107784)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11968494&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 11:52:14
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:43:13
@article{e287dc93-ab9c-4109-b974-e058e6bba448,
  abstract     = {Molecular evolution approaches to developing molecules with characteristics particularly suited for specific applications have become important tools in biomedicine and biotechnology. Not only is it possible to identify molecules with specificities that cannot easily be obtained by other means, but it is also possible to fine-tune in an efficient manner the properties for, in principle, any specified application. Attention has particularly been put into identifying molecules with specific reaction-rate and affinity properties. Depending on the intended application, the binding of a molecule to its target is desired to be long-lived or short-lived. In biosensors, it will generally be appropriate for the association between the ligand and its receptor to be rapid. However, the dissociation of the complex should also be fast to ensure a rapid response of the sensor to a changing environment, particularly in on-line systems. In contrast, stable, nondissociating interactions are favored when, for example, an antibody (Ab) is used for tumor imaging or tumor therapy. In conventional immunoassays, high affinity (and specificity) is often sought to ensure a high sensitivity of the assay. However, under conditions in which a high throughput rather than a highly sensitive format is necessary, it may be more important to have a rapid association rate and a rapid establishment of equilibrium of the assay system than simply to have an assay based on high affinity alone.},
  author       = {Malmborg Hager, Ann-Christin and Nilsson, Nina and Ohlin, Mats},
  issn         = {1940-6029},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {53--245},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Methods in Molecular Biology},
  title        = {Selection of antibodies based on antibody kinetic binding properties.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-240-6:245},
  volume       = {178},
  year         = {2002},
}