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Outcome of case management based on the strengths model compared to standard care. A randomised controlled trial.

Björkman, Tommy LU ; Hansson, Lars LU and Sandlund, Mikael (2002) In Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 37(4). p.147-152
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The outcome of less intensive case management services, such as the strengths model, is still inconclusive, which suggests a need for more controlled studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcome of a strengths model of case management service (SCM) compared to standard care. METHODS: Seventy-seven clients with a mental illness and a serious impairment in functioning in social contacts, housing or work situation were randomly allocated to SCM or standard care. Outcome was assessed with regard to use of psychiatric services, changes in symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, social network, needs for care, quality of life and client satisfaction with care. The follow-up period was 36 months. RESULTS: The... (More)
BACKGROUND: The outcome of less intensive case management services, such as the strengths model, is still inconclusive, which suggests a need for more controlled studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcome of a strengths model of case management service (SCM) compared to standard care. METHODS: Seventy-seven clients with a mental illness and a serious impairment in functioning in social contacts, housing or work situation were randomly allocated to SCM or standard care. Outcome was assessed with regard to use of psychiatric services, changes in symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, social network, needs for care, quality of life and client satisfaction with care. The follow-up period was 36 months. RESULTS: The results showed a greater reduction in needs for care in clients receiving SCM. No differences in clinical or social outcome were shown. Clients receiving SCM also used significantly less days in psychiatric inpatient services and were generally more satisfied with the psychiatric services offered. CONCLUSIONS: SCM failed to improve clinical and social outcome compared to standard care, but was more successful in reducing days spent in hospital, and the clients were also more satisfied with the service compared to standard care. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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published
subject
keywords
Organizational, Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care), Models, Middle Age, Mental Disorders : therapy, Male, Human, Community Mental Health Services : organization & administration, Female, Patient Satisfaction, Social Adjustment, Statistics, Nonparametric, Adult, Analysis of Variance, Case Management : organization & administration
in
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
volume
37
issue
4
pages
147 - 152
publisher
Steinkopff
external identifiers
  • pmid:12027240
  • wos:000175144200001
  • scopus:0036939537
ISSN
0933-7954
DOI
10.1007/s001270200008
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f0da2c78-111c-476e-b5b5-ddc836ffd8f8 (old id 108474)
date added to LUP
2007-07-11 15:51:28
date last changed
2017-01-22 03:36:41
@article{f0da2c78-111c-476e-b5b5-ddc836ffd8f8,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The outcome of less intensive case management services, such as the strengths model, is still inconclusive, which suggests a need for more controlled studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcome of a strengths model of case management service (SCM) compared to standard care. METHODS: Seventy-seven clients with a mental illness and a serious impairment in functioning in social contacts, housing or work situation were randomly allocated to SCM or standard care. Outcome was assessed with regard to use of psychiatric services, changes in symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, social network, needs for care, quality of life and client satisfaction with care. The follow-up period was 36 months. RESULTS: The results showed a greater reduction in needs for care in clients receiving SCM. No differences in clinical or social outcome were shown. Clients receiving SCM also used significantly less days in psychiatric inpatient services and were generally more satisfied with the psychiatric services offered. CONCLUSIONS: SCM failed to improve clinical and social outcome compared to standard care, but was more successful in reducing days spent in hospital, and the clients were also more satisfied with the service compared to standard care.},
  author       = {Björkman, Tommy and Hansson, Lars and Sandlund, Mikael},
  issn         = {0933-7954},
  keyword      = {Organizational,Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care),Models,Middle Age,Mental Disorders : therapy,Male,Human,Community Mental Health Services : organization & administration,Female,Patient Satisfaction,Social Adjustment,Statistics,Nonparametric,Adult,Analysis of Variance,Case Management : organization & administration},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {147--152},
  publisher    = {Steinkopff},
  series       = {Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology},
  title        = {Outcome of case management based on the strengths model compared to standard care. A randomised controlled trial.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s001270200008},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2002},
}