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Visual influence on postural control, with and without visual motion feedback.

Hafström, Anna LU ; Fransson, Per-Anders LU ; Karlberg, Mikael LU ; Ledin, Torbjörn and Magnusson, Måns LU (2002) In Acta Oto-Laryngologica 122(4). p.392-397
Abstract
Body sway was investigated in 20 healthy subjects to determine whether visual input must contain motion feedback information from the surroundings in order to influence postural control. Posturography was used to record body sway under the following visual conditions: eyes open with or without a restricted visual field; eyes open in ganzfield white light; eyes open in darkness with a head-fixed visual target; eyes open in darkness; and eyes closed in darkness. Stance was perturbed by means of a pseudorandomly applied vibratory stimulation to the calf muscles. Least sway was found with eyes open in an unrestricted visual field but increased in a restricted visual field. Greatest sway was found without visual motion feedback, i.e. under the... (More)
Body sway was investigated in 20 healthy subjects to determine whether visual input must contain motion feedback information from the surroundings in order to influence postural control. Posturography was used to record body sway under the following visual conditions: eyes open with or without a restricted visual field; eyes open in ganzfield white light; eyes open in darkness with a head-fixed visual target; eyes open in darkness; and eyes closed in darkness. Stance was perturbed by means of a pseudorandomly applied vibratory stimulation to the calf muscles. Least sway was found with eyes open in an unrestricted visual field but increased in a restricted visual field. Greatest sway was found without visual motion feedback, i.e. under the following conditions: eyes closed; eyes open in darkness; eyes open in ganzfield white light; and with a head-mounted fixation point. Sway was significantly (p < 0.05) greater with eyes open in darkness compared with eyes closed during the initial 50 s with perturbations. After 150 s, sway was almost identical under the four test conditions without visual motion feedback. Standing with eyes open in darkness was initially a disadvantage compared with having the eyes closed. The postural control system may be programmed to expect visual feedback information when the eyes are open, which may delay changes in postural strategy. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Oto-Laryngologica
volume
122
issue
4
pages
392 - 397
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000176301800007
  • pmid:12125995
  • scopus:0035990189
ISSN
1651-2251
DOI
10.1080/00016480260000076
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f7fb3d49-a3d6-4033-99b7-8c261aaf4db7 (old id 109507)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12125995&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 12:01:44
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:45:40
@article{f7fb3d49-a3d6-4033-99b7-8c261aaf4db7,
  abstract     = {Body sway was investigated in 20 healthy subjects to determine whether visual input must contain motion feedback information from the surroundings in order to influence postural control. Posturography was used to record body sway under the following visual conditions: eyes open with or without a restricted visual field; eyes open in ganzfield white light; eyes open in darkness with a head-fixed visual target; eyes open in darkness; and eyes closed in darkness. Stance was perturbed by means of a pseudorandomly applied vibratory stimulation to the calf muscles. Least sway was found with eyes open in an unrestricted visual field but increased in a restricted visual field. Greatest sway was found without visual motion feedback, i.e. under the following conditions: eyes closed; eyes open in darkness; eyes open in ganzfield white light; and with a head-mounted fixation point. Sway was significantly (p &lt; 0.05) greater with eyes open in darkness compared with eyes closed during the initial 50 s with perturbations. After 150 s, sway was almost identical under the four test conditions without visual motion feedback. Standing with eyes open in darkness was initially a disadvantage compared with having the eyes closed. The postural control system may be programmed to expect visual feedback information when the eyes are open, which may delay changes in postural strategy.},
  author       = {Hafström, Anna and Fransson, Per-Anders and Karlberg, Mikael and Ledin, Torbjörn and Magnusson, Måns},
  issn         = {1651-2251},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {392--397},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Oto-Laryngologica},
  title        = {Visual influence on postural control, with and without visual motion feedback.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480260000076},
  volume       = {122},
  year         = {2002},
}