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Psychosocial factors and glycemic control in insulin-naïve and insulin-experienced people with type 2 diabetes : a path analysis model

Aghili, Rokhsareh; Ridderstråle, Martin LU ; Farshchi, Amir; Valojerdi, Ameneh Ebrahim; Banazadeh, Zahra; Malek, Mojtaba; Kia, Maryam and Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim (2018) In International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries 38(3). p.289-297
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the status of psychosocial factors and glycemic control in insulin-naïve and insulin-experienced people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this observational study on people with T2D, demographic, self-care behavior, resources, and affective variables as well as health-related quality of life were assessed and compared in insulin-naïve and insulin-experienced considering the number of oral glucose-lowering drugs (OGLDs). Measured variable path analysis was used to test the association among variables and their effect on HbA1c in both groups. In total, 215 insulin-naïve and 165 insulin-experienced patients were recruited in this study. The mean duration of diabetes was 11.7 ± 7.0 years in... (More)

The purpose of this study was to compare the status of psychosocial factors and glycemic control in insulin-naïve and insulin-experienced people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this observational study on people with T2D, demographic, self-care behavior, resources, and affective variables as well as health-related quality of life were assessed and compared in insulin-naïve and insulin-experienced considering the number of oral glucose-lowering drugs (OGLDs). Measured variable path analysis was used to test the association among variables and their effect on HbA1c in both groups. In total, 215 insulin-naïve and 165 insulin-experienced patients were recruited in this study. The mean duration of diabetes was 11.7 ± 7.0 years in insulin-experienced and 6.8 ± 5.4 years in insulin-naïve (p < 0.001). The mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was significantly higher in insulin-experienced subjects irrespective of the number of OGLDs [68 ± 20 mmol/mol (8.4 ± 1.8%) vs. 56 ± 16 mmol/mol (7.3 ± 1.4%); p < 0.001]. Moreover, insulin-experienced subjects had significantly higher level of diabetes-related distress (2.2 ± 0.9 vs. 1.9 ± 0.8), depression (9.5 ± 5.5 vs. 8.1 ± 5.1), anxiety (18.3 ± 12.0 vs. 15.1 ± 10.5), and lower knowledge of insulin use considering the results of 9-item insulin-use subscale of Michigan diabetes knowledge test (mean 3.9 ± 1.8) compared to insulin-naïve subjects (p < 0.05). Higher levels of distress, depression, and anxiety are found in insulin-experienced people with T2D. Therefore, one should be aware that, at the time of insulin need/initiation, people with T2D have reached a more vulnerable state and this should be taken into consideration when implementing a complex insulin initiation plan.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Diabetes, type 2, Glycemic control, Psychosocial
in
International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries
volume
38
issue
3
pages
9 pages
external identifiers
  • scopus:85052995141
ISSN
0973-3930
DOI
10.1007/s13410-017-0581-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
10ef85f8-ff81-4797-ba74-89c69c93cda9
date added to LUP
2018-10-12 09:29:53
date last changed
2019-01-06 14:09:48
@article{10ef85f8-ff81-4797-ba74-89c69c93cda9,
  abstract     = {<p>The purpose of this study was to compare the status of psychosocial factors and glycemic control in insulin-naïve and insulin-experienced people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this observational study on people with T2D, demographic, self-care behavior, resources, and affective variables as well as health-related quality of life were assessed and compared in insulin-naïve and insulin-experienced considering the number of oral glucose-lowering drugs (OGLDs). Measured variable path analysis was used to test the association among variables and their effect on HbA1c in both groups. In total, 215 insulin-naïve and 165 insulin-experienced patients were recruited in this study. The mean duration of diabetes was 11.7 ± 7.0 years in insulin-experienced and 6.8 ± 5.4 years in insulin-naïve (p &lt; 0.001). The mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was significantly higher in insulin-experienced subjects irrespective of the number of OGLDs [68 ± 20 mmol/mol (8.4 ± 1.8%) vs. 56 ± 16 mmol/mol (7.3 ± 1.4%); p &lt; 0.001]. Moreover, insulin-experienced subjects had significantly higher level of diabetes-related distress (2.2 ± 0.9 vs. 1.9 ± 0.8), depression (9.5 ± 5.5 vs. 8.1 ± 5.1), anxiety (18.3 ± 12.0 vs. 15.1 ± 10.5), and lower knowledge of insulin use considering the results of 9-item insulin-use subscale of Michigan diabetes knowledge test (mean 3.9 ± 1.8) compared to insulin-naïve subjects (p &lt; 0.05). Higher levels of distress, depression, and anxiety are found in insulin-experienced people with T2D. Therefore, one should be aware that, at the time of insulin need/initiation, people with T2D have reached a more vulnerable state and this should be taken into consideration when implementing a complex insulin initiation plan.</p>},
  author       = {Aghili, Rokhsareh and Ridderstråle, Martin and Farshchi, Amir and Valojerdi, Ameneh Ebrahim and Banazadeh, Zahra and Malek, Mojtaba and Kia, Maryam and Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim},
  issn         = {0973-3930},
  keyword      = {Diabetes, type 2,Glycemic control,Psychosocial},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {289--297},
  series       = {International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries},
  title        = {Psychosocial factors and glycemic control in insulin-naïve and insulin-experienced people with type 2 diabetes : a path analysis model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13410-017-0581-2},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2018},
}