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Process Understanding of Soil BVOC Fluxes in Natural Ecosystems : A Review

Tang, J. LU ; Schurgers, G. LU and Rinnan, R. LU (2019) In Reviews of Geophysics 57(3). p.966-986
Abstract

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be released from soils to the atmosphere through microbial decomposition of plant residues or soil organic carbon, root emission, evaporation of litter-stored BVOCs, and other physical processes. Soils can also act as a sink of BVOCs through biotic and abiotic uptake. Currently, the source and sink capabilities of soils have not been explicitly accounted for in global BVOC estimates from the terrestrial biosphere. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of soil BVOC processes and aim to propose a generic framework for modelling soil BVOCs based on current understanding and data availability. To achieve this target, we start by reviewing measured sources and sinks of soil BVOCs... (More)

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be released from soils to the atmosphere through microbial decomposition of plant residues or soil organic carbon, root emission, evaporation of litter-stored BVOCs, and other physical processes. Soils can also act as a sink of BVOCs through biotic and abiotic uptake. Currently, the source and sink capabilities of soils have not been explicitly accounted for in global BVOC estimates from the terrestrial biosphere. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of soil BVOC processes and aim to propose a generic framework for modelling soil BVOCs based on current understanding and data availability. To achieve this target, we start by reviewing measured sources and sinks of soil BVOCs and summarize commonly reported compounds. Next, we strive to disentangle the drivers for the underlying biotic and abiotic processes. We have ranked the list of compounds, known to be emitted from soils, based on our current understanding of how each process controls emission and uptake. We then present a modelling framework to describe soil BVOC emissions. The proposed framework is an important step toward initializing modelling exercises related to soil BVOC fluxes. Finally, we also provide suggestions for measurements needed to separate individual processes, as well as explore long-term and large-scale patterns in soil BVOC fluxes.

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author
; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
biogenic volatile organic compound, decomposition, ecosystem models, microbial activity, soil emission, soil uptake
in
Reviews of Geophysics
volume
57
issue
3
pages
21 pages
publisher
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
external identifiers
  • scopus:85070695256
ISSN
8755-1209
DOI
10.1029/2018RG000634
project
Modelling Arctic Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions and their Impacts on Regional Air Quality
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
10faf2b5-0255-4d49-8108-9b45262caa6d
date added to LUP
2019-10-25 15:55:03
date last changed
2020-12-29 01:05:10
@article{10faf2b5-0255-4d49-8108-9b45262caa6d,
  abstract     = {<p>Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be released from soils to the atmosphere through microbial decomposition of plant residues or soil organic carbon, root emission, evaporation of litter-stored BVOCs, and other physical processes. Soils can also act as a sink of BVOCs through biotic and abiotic uptake. Currently, the source and sink capabilities of soils have not been explicitly accounted for in global BVOC estimates from the terrestrial biosphere. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of soil BVOC processes and aim to propose a generic framework for modelling soil BVOCs based on current understanding and data availability. To achieve this target, we start by reviewing measured sources and sinks of soil BVOCs and summarize commonly reported compounds. Next, we strive to disentangle the drivers for the underlying biotic and abiotic processes. We have ranked the list of compounds, known to be emitted from soils, based on our current understanding of how each process controls emission and uptake. We then present a modelling framework to describe soil BVOC emissions. The proposed framework is an important step toward initializing modelling exercises related to soil BVOC fluxes. Finally, we also provide suggestions for measurements needed to separate individual processes, as well as explore long-term and large-scale patterns in soil BVOC fluxes.</p>},
  author       = {Tang, J. and Schurgers, G. and Rinnan, R.},
  issn         = {8755-1209},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {966--986},
  publisher    = {American Geophysical Union (AGU)},
  series       = {Reviews of Geophysics},
  title        = {Process Understanding of Soil BVOC Fluxes in Natural Ecosystems : A Review},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2018RG000634},
  doi          = {10.1029/2018RG000634},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2019},
}