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Radioimmunoassay of beta-microseminoprotein, a prostatic-secreted protein present in sera of both men and women

Abrahamsson, Per-Anders LU ; Andersson, C; Björk, Thomas LU ; Fernlund, Per LU ; Lilja, Hans LU ; Murne, A and Weiber, Håkan LU (1989) In Clinical Chemistry 35(7). p.1497-1503
Abstract
We describe a simple radioimmunoassay of beta-microseminoprotein, one of the three most abundant secretory proteins of the prostate gland. The detection limit of the assay is 1 microgram/L, and its precision, expressed as the total coefficient of variation, is less than 10% for values between 10 and 150 micrograms/L. Using this assay, we found that beta-microseminoprotein immunoreactivity was present in sera from both sexes at about the same concentration. The protein detected had the same molecular size on gel chromatography as the protein isolated from seminal plasma, and dilution curves for the sera paralleled that for the pure protein. The findings suggest that beta-microseminoprotein is present in serum of healthy subjects of both... (More)
We describe a simple radioimmunoassay of beta-microseminoprotein, one of the three most abundant secretory proteins of the prostate gland. The detection limit of the assay is 1 microgram/L, and its precision, expressed as the total coefficient of variation, is less than 10% for values between 10 and 150 micrograms/L. Using this assay, we found that beta-microseminoprotein immunoreactivity was present in sera from both sexes at about the same concentration. The protein detected had the same molecular size on gel chromatography as the protein isolated from seminal plasma, and dilution curves for the sera paralleled that for the pure protein. The findings suggest that beta-microseminoprotein is present in serum of healthy subjects of both sexes and that it originates in tissue other than the prostate gland. The range of the serum concentration was 0-10.6 micrograms/L (median 4.1) for 51 healthy adult women and 1.1-14.7 micrograms/L (median 6.2) for 35 healthy adult men not older than 40 years. In males with prostatic cancer the concentration in serum was highly variable and often greatly increased. The concentration of beta-microseminoprotein was correlated with that of creatinine in serum, suggesting that the protein is eliminated--at least partly--from the circulation by glomerular filtration. Little of the protein was present in the urine of women. In urine from men the concentration was high and variable, probably because of local contribution from the prostate gland to the urethral urine. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
fertility, gonadotropins, beta-inhibin, prostatic cancer, reference values, renal function, seminal plasma, urine
in
Clinical Chemistry
volume
35
issue
7
pages
1497 - 1503
publisher
American Association for Clinical Chemistry
external identifiers
  • pmid:2758596
ISSN
0009-9147
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ac7af7d7-6199-4d99-94a2-f5e6c672b9f7 (old id 1104516)
alternative location
http://www.clinchem.org/cgi/reprint/35/7/1497
date added to LUP
2008-08-06 09:33:23
date last changed
2016-04-15 19:34:12
@article{ac7af7d7-6199-4d99-94a2-f5e6c672b9f7,
  abstract     = {We describe a simple radioimmunoassay of beta-microseminoprotein, one of the three most abundant secretory proteins of the prostate gland. The detection limit of the assay is 1 microgram/L, and its precision, expressed as the total coefficient of variation, is less than 10% for values between 10 and 150 micrograms/L. Using this assay, we found that beta-microseminoprotein immunoreactivity was present in sera from both sexes at about the same concentration. The protein detected had the same molecular size on gel chromatography as the protein isolated from seminal plasma, and dilution curves for the sera paralleled that for the pure protein. The findings suggest that beta-microseminoprotein is present in serum of healthy subjects of both sexes and that it originates in tissue other than the prostate gland. The range of the serum concentration was 0-10.6 micrograms/L (median 4.1) for 51 healthy adult women and 1.1-14.7 micrograms/L (median 6.2) for 35 healthy adult men not older than 40 years. In males with prostatic cancer the concentration in serum was highly variable and often greatly increased. The concentration of beta-microseminoprotein was correlated with that of creatinine in serum, suggesting that the protein is eliminated--at least partly--from the circulation by glomerular filtration. Little of the protein was present in the urine of women. In urine from men the concentration was high and variable, probably because of local contribution from the prostate gland to the urethral urine.},
  author       = {Abrahamsson, Per-Anders and Andersson, C and Björk, Thomas and Fernlund, Per and Lilja, Hans and Murne, A and Weiber, Håkan},
  issn         = {0009-9147},
  keyword      = {fertility,gonadotropins,beta-inhibin,prostatic cancer,reference values,renal function,seminal plasma,urine},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1497--1503},
  publisher    = {American Association for Clinical Chemistry},
  series       = {Clinical Chemistry},
  title        = {Radioimmunoassay of beta-microseminoprotein, a prostatic-secreted protein present in sera of both men and women},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {1989},
}