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Difference in tissue response to nitrogen-ion-implanted titanium and c.p. titanium in the abdominal wall of the rat

Rostlund, Tord; Thomsen, Peter; Bjursten, Lars Magnus LU and Ericson, Lars E (1990) In Journal of Biomedical Materials Research 24(7). p.847-860
Abstract
Ion implantation modifies the surface properties of different materials. We have compared the biological properties of titanium implanted with nitrogen with those of pure titanium. Implants were inserted in the abdominal wall of rats. The implants with surrounding tissue were excised after 1 and 6 weeks, and embedded in epoxy resin. The bulk metal was removed electrochemically and the tissue cut for light and electron microscopy. Using this technique the implant surface, formed by a thin oxide layer, remains and appears in sections as a dense line. After 1 week both types of implants were surrounded by a fluid space containing proteins and scattered macrophages but few polymorphonuclear granulocytes. The fluid space was wider around... (More)
Ion implantation modifies the surface properties of different materials. We have compared the biological properties of titanium implanted with nitrogen with those of pure titanium. Implants were inserted in the abdominal wall of rats. The implants with surrounding tissue were excised after 1 and 6 weeks, and embedded in epoxy resin. The bulk metal was removed electrochemically and the tissue cut for light and electron microscopy. Using this technique the implant surface, formed by a thin oxide layer, remains and appears in sections as a dense line. After 1 week both types of implants were surrounded by a fluid space containing proteins and scattered macrophages but few polymorphonuclear granulocytes. The fluid space was wider around ion-implanted titanium (52 +/- 22 microns) than around pure titanium implants (15 +/- 3 microns). After 6 weeks the fluid space had largely disappeared around both type of implants. Around pure titanium implants macrophages and fibroblasts, quantified in 1-micron-thick sections in the light microscope, were present in about the same concentration in the inner tissue zone (within 25 microns from the implant surface). Around ion-implanted titanium macrophages predominated in the inner zone and multinuclear giant cells were present in almost all sections. Around both type of implants fibroblasts increased and macrophages decreased with increasing distance from the surface. In the electron microscope macrophages close to the surface of pure titanium were of small size and had an ultrastructure indicating a low activity. Macrophages close to ion-implanted titanium were large and had an active appearance as indicated by the presence of large amounts of endoplasmic reticulum and large Golgi areas in the cytoplasm. Our observations indicate that modification of the surface properties of titanium implants by ion implantation changes the biological properties. (Less)
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author
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research
volume
24
issue
7
pages
847 - 860
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:2144531
  • scopus:0025454231
ISSN
0021-9304
DOI
10.1002/jbm.820240705
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
645e20eb-b644-46b9-964d-9dcb9560a647 (old id 1104952)
date added to LUP
2008-08-04 14:25:03
date last changed
2017-05-07 03:42:45
@article{645e20eb-b644-46b9-964d-9dcb9560a647,
  abstract     = {Ion implantation modifies the surface properties of different materials. We have compared the biological properties of titanium implanted with nitrogen with those of pure titanium. Implants were inserted in the abdominal wall of rats. The implants with surrounding tissue were excised after 1 and 6 weeks, and embedded in epoxy resin. The bulk metal was removed electrochemically and the tissue cut for light and electron microscopy. Using this technique the implant surface, formed by a thin oxide layer, remains and appears in sections as a dense line. After 1 week both types of implants were surrounded by a fluid space containing proteins and scattered macrophages but few polymorphonuclear granulocytes. The fluid space was wider around ion-implanted titanium (52 +/- 22 microns) than around pure titanium implants (15 +/- 3 microns). After 6 weeks the fluid space had largely disappeared around both type of implants. Around pure titanium implants macrophages and fibroblasts, quantified in 1-micron-thick sections in the light microscope, were present in about the same concentration in the inner tissue zone (within 25 microns from the implant surface). Around ion-implanted titanium macrophages predominated in the inner zone and multinuclear giant cells were present in almost all sections. Around both type of implants fibroblasts increased and macrophages decreased with increasing distance from the surface. In the electron microscope macrophages close to the surface of pure titanium were of small size and had an ultrastructure indicating a low activity. Macrophages close to ion-implanted titanium were large and had an active appearance as indicated by the presence of large amounts of endoplasmic reticulum and large Golgi areas in the cytoplasm. Our observations indicate that modification of the surface properties of titanium implants by ion implantation changes the biological properties.},
  author       = {Rostlund, Tord and Thomsen, Peter and Bjursten, Lars Magnus and Ericson, Lars E},
  issn         = {0021-9304},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {847--860},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Biomedical Materials Research},
  title        = {Difference in tissue response to nitrogen-ion-implanted titanium and c.p. titanium in the abdominal wall of the rat},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.820240705},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {1990},
}