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Role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide in the regulation of tonus in large-bore arterial resistance vessels, arterioles and veins in cat skeletal muscle

Ekelund, Ulf LU and Mellander, Stefan LU (1990) In Acta Physiologica Scandinavica 140(3). p.301-309
Abstract
The role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide in the regulation of vascular resistance (tonus) in cat skeletal muscle was studied with the use of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide formation from L-arginine. The study was performed with a whole-organ technique which permits simultaneous, continuous and quantitative recordings of resistance reactions in the whole vascular bed (RT) and in its three consecutive sections: large-bore arterial resistance vessels (greater than 25 microns; Ra,prox), small arterioles (less than 25 microns; Ra,micro) and veins (Rv). NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (3-100 mg kg-1 tissue, i.a.) induced a dose-dependent increase in resistance that was preferentially, but not selectively,... (More)
The role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide in the regulation of vascular resistance (tonus) in cat skeletal muscle was studied with the use of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide formation from L-arginine. The study was performed with a whole-organ technique which permits simultaneous, continuous and quantitative recordings of resistance reactions in the whole vascular bed (RT) and in its three consecutive sections: large-bore arterial resistance vessels (greater than 25 microns; Ra,prox), small arterioles (less than 25 microns; Ra,micro) and veins (Rv). NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (3-100 mg kg-1 tissue, i.a.) induced a dose-dependent increase in resistance that was preferentially, but not selectively, confined to the large-bore arterial resistance vessels. At a maximally effective dose (100 mg kg-1), the nitric oxide inhibitor caused a marked constriction, within 5 min, on average increasing RT by 99%, Ra,prox by 138%, Ra,micro by 18% and Rv by 23%. The constrictor response to NG-monomethyl-L-arginine was long-lasting but disappeared gradually over a period of about 1 h. However, it could be abruptly abolished by excess L-arginine (300 mg kg-1, i.a.). The vasodilator response (RT) to acetylcholine was significantly attenuated in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine compared with the control response. The results suggested that nitric oxide formation from L-arginine by the vascular endothelium plays a fundamental role in the regulation of vascular resistance (tone) in vivo, with its main site of action located in the large-bore arterial resistance vessels. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Physiologica Scandinavica
volume
140
issue
3
pages
301 - 309
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:2082699
  • scopus:0025053288
ISSN
0001-6772
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2e15d401-0837-46bc-bae0-dbfa9b768039 (old id 1105109)
date added to LUP
2008-08-04 16:56:04
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:34:56
@article{2e15d401-0837-46bc-bae0-dbfa9b768039,
  abstract     = {The role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide in the regulation of vascular resistance (tonus) in cat skeletal muscle was studied with the use of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide formation from L-arginine. The study was performed with a whole-organ technique which permits simultaneous, continuous and quantitative recordings of resistance reactions in the whole vascular bed (RT) and in its three consecutive sections: large-bore arterial resistance vessels (greater than 25 microns; Ra,prox), small arterioles (less than 25 microns; Ra,micro) and veins (Rv). NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (3-100 mg kg-1 tissue, i.a.) induced a dose-dependent increase in resistance that was preferentially, but not selectively, confined to the large-bore arterial resistance vessels. At a maximally effective dose (100 mg kg-1), the nitric oxide inhibitor caused a marked constriction, within 5 min, on average increasing RT by 99%, Ra,prox by 138%, Ra,micro by 18% and Rv by 23%. The constrictor response to NG-monomethyl-L-arginine was long-lasting but disappeared gradually over a period of about 1 h. However, it could be abruptly abolished by excess L-arginine (300 mg kg-1, i.a.). The vasodilator response (RT) to acetylcholine was significantly attenuated in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine compared with the control response. The results suggested that nitric oxide formation from L-arginine by the vascular endothelium plays a fundamental role in the regulation of vascular resistance (tone) in vivo, with its main site of action located in the large-bore arterial resistance vessels.},
  author       = {Ekelund, Ulf and Mellander, Stefan},
  issn         = {0001-6772},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {301--309},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Physiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide in the regulation of tonus in large-bore arterial resistance vessels, arterioles and veins in cat skeletal muscle},
  volume       = {140},
  year         = {1990},
}