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How the inner world is reflected in relation to perceived ward atmosphere among patients with psychosis

Jansson, Jan-Åke LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2002) In Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 37(11). p.519-526
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study focused on how cognitive ability, personality traits, self-rated psychiatric symptoms, and social functioning were related to the way in which patients with psychosis perceived supportive aspects of the ward atmosphere. METHODS: Patients at a psychiatric rehabilitation unit (PRU) in southern Sweden completed a ward atmosphere questionnaire (COPES), rated their psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), self-image (SASB), and were tested on cognitive functioning (WAIS-R) and global social functioning (GAF). They were diagnosed according to ICD-10. Data were analysed by means of logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Self-monitoring and restraining (self-control), one cluster in the SASB, was the strongest factor associated with... (More)
BACKGROUND: This study focused on how cognitive ability, personality traits, self-rated psychiatric symptoms, and social functioning were related to the way in which patients with psychosis perceived supportive aspects of the ward atmosphere. METHODS: Patients at a psychiatric rehabilitation unit (PRU) in southern Sweden completed a ward atmosphere questionnaire (COPES), rated their psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), self-image (SASB), and were tested on cognitive functioning (WAIS-R) and global social functioning (GAF). They were diagnosed according to ICD-10. Data were analysed by means of logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Self-monitoring and restraining (self-control), one cluster in the SASB, was the strongest factor associated with how the patients perceived the ward atmosphere. A perceived high level of self-control indicated high levels of perceived Support, Practical orientation, and Order and organisation of the ward atmosphere. A high level of self-rated paranoid symptoms (SCL-90) increased the risk of perceiving a high level of Anger and aggression and a low level of Program clarity. Regarding cognitive ability (WAIS-R), two factors were important for predicting perceived ward atmosphere. A low level of social competence was associated with a low level of perceived Order and organisation. Furthermore, a low level of abstract thinking was related to a low level of perceived Anger and aggression, while a high level of abstract thinking was associated with a low level of Program clarity. Patients with schizophrenia exhibited a lower level of Self-monitoring and restraining than patients with other psychoses. CONCLUSION: The results from this study indicate that individual factors such as self-control, paranoid symptoms and social competence may be important for how the ward atmosphere is perceived. This is important knowledge when monitoring the ward atmosphere to better fit a unit's target group. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
volume
37
issue
11
pages
519 - 526
publisher
Steinkopff
external identifiers
  • pmid:12395141
  • wos:000179008500003
  • scopus:0036961194
ISSN
0933-7954
DOI
10.1007/s00127-002-0584-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c7427867-abe3-4052-90d3-1e6aa3249171 (old id 110514)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12395141&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 16:05:40
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:54:12
@article{c7427867-abe3-4052-90d3-1e6aa3249171,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: This study focused on how cognitive ability, personality traits, self-rated psychiatric symptoms, and social functioning were related to the way in which patients with psychosis perceived supportive aspects of the ward atmosphere. METHODS: Patients at a psychiatric rehabilitation unit (PRU) in southern Sweden completed a ward atmosphere questionnaire (COPES), rated their psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), self-image (SASB), and were tested on cognitive functioning (WAIS-R) and global social functioning (GAF). They were diagnosed according to ICD-10. Data were analysed by means of logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Self-monitoring and restraining (self-control), one cluster in the SASB, was the strongest factor associated with how the patients perceived the ward atmosphere. A perceived high level of self-control indicated high levels of perceived Support, Practical orientation, and Order and organisation of the ward atmosphere. A high level of self-rated paranoid symptoms (SCL-90) increased the risk of perceiving a high level of Anger and aggression and a low level of Program clarity. Regarding cognitive ability (WAIS-R), two factors were important for predicting perceived ward atmosphere. A low level of social competence was associated with a low level of perceived Order and organisation. Furthermore, a low level of abstract thinking was related to a low level of perceived Anger and aggression, while a high level of abstract thinking was associated with a low level of Program clarity. Patients with schizophrenia exhibited a lower level of Self-monitoring and restraining than patients with other psychoses. CONCLUSION: The results from this study indicate that individual factors such as self-control, paranoid symptoms and social competence may be important for how the ward atmosphere is perceived. This is important knowledge when monitoring the ward atmosphere to better fit a unit's target group.},
  author       = {Jansson, Jan-Åke and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {0933-7954},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {519--526},
  publisher    = {Steinkopff},
  series       = {Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology},
  title        = {How the inner world is reflected in relation to perceived ward atmosphere among patients with psychosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-002-0584-1},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2002},
}