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The clinical importance of a thick-walled, tender gall-bladder without stones on ultrasonography

Ekberg, Olle LU and Weiber, S (1991) In Clinical Radiology 44(1). p.38-41
Abstract
Ultrasound examinations of 563 patients with right upper quadrant pain and a clinical suspicion of acute cholecystitis were reviewed. In 31 patients, a tender, dilated gall-bladder with a thick (more than 4 mm) partly hypoechoic wall without any detectable calculi was found on the emergency examination. This was interpreted as due to acute acalculous cholecystitis. None of the patients was critically ill. Twenty-one of the patients had follow-up studies with either oral cholecystography, cholangiography, or ultrasound. Fourteen of the 21 had gall-bladder calculi while seven did not. These seven patients presumably represent the true frequency (1.2%) of acute acalculous cholecystitis in this clinical setting. In five other patients with an... (More)
Ultrasound examinations of 563 patients with right upper quadrant pain and a clinical suspicion of acute cholecystitis were reviewed. In 31 patients, a tender, dilated gall-bladder with a thick (more than 4 mm) partly hypoechoic wall without any detectable calculi was found on the emergency examination. This was interpreted as due to acute acalculous cholecystitis. None of the patients was critically ill. Twenty-one of the patients had follow-up studies with either oral cholecystography, cholangiography, or ultrasound. Fourteen of the 21 had gall-bladder calculi while seven did not. These seven patients presumably represent the true frequency (1.2%) of acute acalculous cholecystitis in this clinical setting. In five other patients with an initial diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis the gall-bladder wall thickening probably was secondary to concomitant pancreatitis, appendicitis, hepatitis or peptic ulcer disease. A meticulous and careful search for gall-bladder calculi should be performed in the presence of a dilated, tender thick-walled gall-bladder. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Radiology
volume
44
issue
1
pages
38 - 41
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:1873951
  • scopus:0025923056
ISSN
1365-229X
DOI
10.1016/S0009-9260(05)80225-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7ed3bc23-1353-4df8-b351-4b3ecbdae820 (old id 1105818)
date added to LUP
2008-08-04 11:51:46
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:42:15
@article{7ed3bc23-1353-4df8-b351-4b3ecbdae820,
  abstract     = {Ultrasound examinations of 563 patients with right upper quadrant pain and a clinical suspicion of acute cholecystitis were reviewed. In 31 patients, a tender, dilated gall-bladder with a thick (more than 4 mm) partly hypoechoic wall without any detectable calculi was found on the emergency examination. This was interpreted as due to acute acalculous cholecystitis. None of the patients was critically ill. Twenty-one of the patients had follow-up studies with either oral cholecystography, cholangiography, or ultrasound. Fourteen of the 21 had gall-bladder calculi while seven did not. These seven patients presumably represent the true frequency (1.2%) of acute acalculous cholecystitis in this clinical setting. In five other patients with an initial diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis the gall-bladder wall thickening probably was secondary to concomitant pancreatitis, appendicitis, hepatitis or peptic ulcer disease. A meticulous and careful search for gall-bladder calculi should be performed in the presence of a dilated, tender thick-walled gall-bladder.},
  author       = {Ekberg, Olle and Weiber, S},
  issn         = {1365-229X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {38--41},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Clinical Radiology},
  title        = {The clinical importance of a thick-walled, tender gall-bladder without stones on ultrasonography},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0009-9260(05)80225-9},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {1991},
}