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Altered swallowing function in elderly patients without dysphagia: radiologic findings in 56 cases

Ekberg, Olle LU and Feinberg, Michael J (1991) In American Journal of Roentgenology 156(6). p.1181-1184
Abstract
Swallowing disorder is an increasing problem in our aging population. A majority of these patients have a functional abnormality of the oral, pharyngeal, and/or esophageal stage of swallowing. However, what constitutes normalcy is not well understood, and baseline swallowing in elderly persons without dysphagia has not been adequately described. We therefore evaluated 56 persons with a mean age of 83 years who had no symptoms of dysphagia or eating difficulty. Videofluoroscopy and radiographs with the subject erect and recumbent were obtained. Normal deglutition, as defined in young persons, was present in only 16%. Oral abnormalities (difficulty ingesting, controlling, and delivering bolus relative to swallowing initiation) were seen in... (More)
Swallowing disorder is an increasing problem in our aging population. A majority of these patients have a functional abnormality of the oral, pharyngeal, and/or esophageal stage of swallowing. However, what constitutes normalcy is not well understood, and baseline swallowing in elderly persons without dysphagia has not been adequately described. We therefore evaluated 56 persons with a mean age of 83 years who had no symptoms of dysphagia or eating difficulty. Videofluoroscopy and radiographs with the subject erect and recumbent were obtained. Normal deglutition, as defined in young persons, was present in only 16%. Oral abnormalities (difficulty ingesting, controlling, and delivering bolus relative to swallowing initiation) were seen in 63%. Pharyngeal dysfunction (bolus retention and lingual propulsion or pharyngeal constrictor paresis) was seen in 25%. Pharyngoesophageal segment abnormalities were observed in 39% (mostly cricopharyngeal muscle dysfunction). Esophageal abnormalities (mostly motor in nature) were observed in 36%. What has been described as swallowing dysfunction in young persons may not be abnormal in very elderly persons. It is difficult to distinguish the effect of normal aging from the effects of specific diseases or gradual degenerative changes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
American Journal of Roentgenology
volume
156
issue
6
pages
1181 - 1184
publisher
American Roentgen Ray Society
external identifiers
  • pmid:2028863
  • scopus:0025771581
ISSN
1546-3141
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b4190559-1659-460b-a332-cc56f6448dce (old id 1105820)
alternative location
http://www.ajronline.org/cgi/reprint/156/6/1181
date added to LUP
2008-08-04 11:54:25
date last changed
2017-05-07 03:34:32
@article{b4190559-1659-460b-a332-cc56f6448dce,
  abstract     = {Swallowing disorder is an increasing problem in our aging population. A majority of these patients have a functional abnormality of the oral, pharyngeal, and/or esophageal stage of swallowing. However, what constitutes normalcy is not well understood, and baseline swallowing in elderly persons without dysphagia has not been adequately described. We therefore evaluated 56 persons with a mean age of 83 years who had no symptoms of dysphagia or eating difficulty. Videofluoroscopy and radiographs with the subject erect and recumbent were obtained. Normal deglutition, as defined in young persons, was present in only 16%. Oral abnormalities (difficulty ingesting, controlling, and delivering bolus relative to swallowing initiation) were seen in 63%. Pharyngeal dysfunction (bolus retention and lingual propulsion or pharyngeal constrictor paresis) was seen in 25%. Pharyngoesophageal segment abnormalities were observed in 39% (mostly cricopharyngeal muscle dysfunction). Esophageal abnormalities (mostly motor in nature) were observed in 36%. What has been described as swallowing dysfunction in young persons may not be abnormal in very elderly persons. It is difficult to distinguish the effect of normal aging from the effects of specific diseases or gradual degenerative changes.},
  author       = {Ekberg, Olle and Feinberg, Michael J},
  issn         = {1546-3141},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1181--1184},
  publisher    = {American Roentgen Ray Society},
  series       = {American Journal of Roentgenology},
  title        = {Altered swallowing function in elderly patients without dysphagia: radiologic findings in 56 cases},
  volume       = {156},
  year         = {1991},
}