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Duodenitis: a reliable radiologic diagnosis?

Levine, M S; Turner, D; Ekberg, Olle LU ; Rubesin, S E and Katzka, D A (1991) In Gastrointestinal Radiology 16(2). p.99-103
Abstract
The authors performed a retrospective study of 50 patients with endoscopically diagnosed duodenitis who had undergone double-contrast upper gastrointestinal (GI) examinations. Duodenitis was diagnosed on the original radiographic reports in six of 37 patients (16%) with mild-to-moderate duodenitis, five of 13 patients (38%) with severe duodenitis, and 11 of 50 patients (22%) with all grades of duodenitis on endoscopy. Subsequent analysis of the films revealed one or more radiologic signs of duodenitis (including folds more than 4 mm in thickness, mucosal nodularity, bulbar deformity, and erosions) in 18 of 37 patients (49%) with mild-to-moderate duodenitis, eight of 13 patients (62%) with severe duodenitis, and 26 of 50 patients (52%) with... (More)
The authors performed a retrospective study of 50 patients with endoscopically diagnosed duodenitis who had undergone double-contrast upper gastrointestinal (GI) examinations. Duodenitis was diagnosed on the original radiographic reports in six of 37 patients (16%) with mild-to-moderate duodenitis, five of 13 patients (38%) with severe duodenitis, and 11 of 50 patients (22%) with all grades of duodenitis on endoscopy. Subsequent analysis of the films revealed one or more radiologic signs of duodenitis (including folds more than 4 mm in thickness, mucosal nodularity, bulbar deformity, and erosions) in 18 of 37 patients (49%) with mild-to-moderate duodenitis, eight of 13 patients (62%) with severe duodenitis, and 26 of 50 patients (52%) with all grades of duodenitis on endoscopy. In a separate part of the study, the authors identified another 20 patients with radiographically diagnosed duodenitis who had undergone endoscopic examinations. Nine of those 20 patients (45%) had duodenitis on endoscopy. Subsequent analysis of the films revealed one or more signs of duodenitis in 17 patients from this group. Nine of the latter patients (53%) had duodenitis on endoscopy. Using established radiologic criteria for duodenitis, our rate of false-positive and false-negative radiologic diagnoses still was about 50%. Thus, the double-contrast upper GI examination is a relatively unreliable technique for diagnosing duodenitis. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Gastrointestinal Radiology
volume
16
issue
2
pages
99 - 103
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:2016037
  • scopus:0025818668
ISSN
0364-2356
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a2b72ea2-6c1b-4297-84c8-36f70e347da5 (old id 1105828)
date added to LUP
2008-08-04 12:03:04
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:19:30
@article{a2b72ea2-6c1b-4297-84c8-36f70e347da5,
  abstract     = {The authors performed a retrospective study of 50 patients with endoscopically diagnosed duodenitis who had undergone double-contrast upper gastrointestinal (GI) examinations. Duodenitis was diagnosed on the original radiographic reports in six of 37 patients (16%) with mild-to-moderate duodenitis, five of 13 patients (38%) with severe duodenitis, and 11 of 50 patients (22%) with all grades of duodenitis on endoscopy. Subsequent analysis of the films revealed one or more radiologic signs of duodenitis (including folds more than 4 mm in thickness, mucosal nodularity, bulbar deformity, and erosions) in 18 of 37 patients (49%) with mild-to-moderate duodenitis, eight of 13 patients (62%) with severe duodenitis, and 26 of 50 patients (52%) with all grades of duodenitis on endoscopy. In a separate part of the study, the authors identified another 20 patients with radiographically diagnosed duodenitis who had undergone endoscopic examinations. Nine of those 20 patients (45%) had duodenitis on endoscopy. Subsequent analysis of the films revealed one or more signs of duodenitis in 17 patients from this group. Nine of the latter patients (53%) had duodenitis on endoscopy. Using established radiologic criteria for duodenitis, our rate of false-positive and false-negative radiologic diagnoses still was about 50%. Thus, the double-contrast upper GI examination is a relatively unreliable technique for diagnosing duodenitis.},
  author       = {Levine, M S and Turner, D and Ekberg, Olle and Rubesin, S E and Katzka, D A},
  issn         = {0364-2356},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {99--103},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Gastrointestinal Radiology},
  title        = {Duodenitis: a reliable radiologic diagnosis?},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {1991},
}