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Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity and hypertension

Erlinge, David LU ; Ekman, Rolf; Thulin, Thomas and Edvinsson, Lars LU (1992) In Journal of Hypertension 10(10). p.1221-1225
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Neuropeptide Y is a co-transmitter with noradrenaline in sympathetic neurons supplying arteries and veins with potent contractile effects. To investigate the role of neuropeptide Y in hypertension, we measured the circulating levels of neuropeptide Y and noradrenaline in patients with severe hypertension. DESIGN: Samples were collected from patients with untreated, severe hypertension (diastolic blood pressure > 120 mmHg) and in age- and sex-matched controls. After treatment with beta-adrenoceptor blockers, diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors of calcium antagonists, samples were taken from the patients during 12 months. METHODS: The circulating levels of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) were... (More)
OBJECTIVE: Neuropeptide Y is a co-transmitter with noradrenaline in sympathetic neurons supplying arteries and veins with potent contractile effects. To investigate the role of neuropeptide Y in hypertension, we measured the circulating levels of neuropeptide Y and noradrenaline in patients with severe hypertension. DESIGN: Samples were collected from patients with untreated, severe hypertension (diastolic blood pressure > 120 mmHg) and in age- and sex-matched controls. After treatment with beta-adrenoceptor blockers, diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors of calcium antagonists, samples were taken from the patients during 12 months. METHODS: The circulating levels of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) were measured with a radioimmunoassay using a rabbit antiserum. Catecholamines were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection. RESULTS: There was a significantly higher level of NPY-LI in the patients when they were compared with the controls. However, there was no correlation either in the controls or in the hypertensives between systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and NPY-LI or noradrenaline. The increased level of NPY-LI in plasma remained elevated for up to 12 months despite reduction in blood pressure to acceptable levels. The noradrenaline level was not increased before treatment, after 2-4 weeks or after 2-12 months treatment. CONCLUSION: The high level of NPY-LI may represent a marker for higher activity of the sympathetic nervous system which is not controlled by the treatment of blood pressure to normotension. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Hypertension
volume
10
issue
10
pages
1221 - 1225
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:1335004
  • scopus:0026448944
ISSN
1473-5598
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
35d2e5dd-6f46-4955-94b2-d8ed4f0f0f55 (old id 1106483)
date added to LUP
2008-08-01 14:01:29
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:07:02
@article{35d2e5dd-6f46-4955-94b2-d8ed4f0f0f55,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: Neuropeptide Y is a co-transmitter with noradrenaline in sympathetic neurons supplying arteries and veins with potent contractile effects. To investigate the role of neuropeptide Y in hypertension, we measured the circulating levels of neuropeptide Y and noradrenaline in patients with severe hypertension. DESIGN: Samples were collected from patients with untreated, severe hypertension (diastolic blood pressure > 120 mmHg) and in age- and sex-matched controls. After treatment with beta-adrenoceptor blockers, diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors of calcium antagonists, samples were taken from the patients during 12 months. METHODS: The circulating levels of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) were measured with a radioimmunoassay using a rabbit antiserum. Catecholamines were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection. RESULTS: There was a significantly higher level of NPY-LI in the patients when they were compared with the controls. However, there was no correlation either in the controls or in the hypertensives between systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and NPY-LI or noradrenaline. The increased level of NPY-LI in plasma remained elevated for up to 12 months despite reduction in blood pressure to acceptable levels. The noradrenaline level was not increased before treatment, after 2-4 weeks or after 2-12 months treatment. CONCLUSION: The high level of NPY-LI may represent a marker for higher activity of the sympathetic nervous system which is not controlled by the treatment of blood pressure to normotension.},
  author       = {Erlinge, David and Ekman, Rolf and Thulin, Thomas and Edvinsson, Lars},
  issn         = {1473-5598},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1221--1225},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Hypertension},
  title        = {Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity and hypertension},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {1992},
}