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Life-course perspective on socioeconomic differences in carotid atherosclerosis.

Rosvall, Maria LU ; Östergren, Per-Olof LU ; Hedblad, Bo LU ; Isacsson, Sven-Olof LU ; Janzon, Lars LU and Berglund, Göran LU (2002) In Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 22(10). p.1704-1711
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Socioeconomic status (SES) in adulthood is known to be related to carotid atherosclerosis. However, few studies have tried to assess its association with SES from a life-course perspective. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined the relationship between SES in childhood and in adulthood and carotid atherosclerosis in a general population of Swedish men and women. Carotid stenosis was determined by B-mode ultrasound. Results showed that women whose fathers' occupations involved unskilled manual labor had higher odds of carotid stenosis than did women whose fathers' occupations involved high- or medium-level nonmanual labor, even after adjustment for adult occupational status and risk factors (odds ratio 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.8). No such... (More)
OBJECTIVE: Socioeconomic status (SES) in adulthood is known to be related to carotid atherosclerosis. However, few studies have tried to assess its association with SES from a life-course perspective. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined the relationship between SES in childhood and in adulthood and carotid atherosclerosis in a general population of Swedish men and women. Carotid stenosis was determined by B-mode ultrasound. Results showed that women whose fathers' occupations involved unskilled manual labor had higher odds of carotid stenosis than did women whose fathers' occupations involved high- or medium-level nonmanual labor, even after adjustment for adult occupational status and risk factors (odds ratio 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.8). No such association appeared in men. Furthermore, the impact of life-course SES on atherosclerosis was examined by using an additive measure of one's combined SES during childhood and adulthood. Among women, the odds of carotid stenosis increased with a rise in exposure to low SES during the life-course (P for trend <0.001). In men, no such trend was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the total life-course exposure to low SES, with contributions from childhood and adulthood, seems to play a role in atherogenesis in women. Such a pattern of association could not be shown in men. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
atherosclerosis, carotid arteries, life-course, socioeconomic status
in
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology
volume
22
issue
10
pages
1704 - 1711
publisher
American Heart Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000178686700033
  • pmid:12377753
  • scopus:0036792641
ISSN
1524-4636
DOI
10.1161/01.ATV.0000032006.75577.24
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d302bd02-a0cb-42be-a6af-5fe679cb08c4 (old id 110675)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 16:58:37
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:33:42
@article{d302bd02-a0cb-42be-a6af-5fe679cb08c4,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: Socioeconomic status (SES) in adulthood is known to be related to carotid atherosclerosis. However, few studies have tried to assess its association with SES from a life-course perspective. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined the relationship between SES in childhood and in adulthood and carotid atherosclerosis in a general population of Swedish men and women. Carotid stenosis was determined by B-mode ultrasound. Results showed that women whose fathers' occupations involved unskilled manual labor had higher odds of carotid stenosis than did women whose fathers' occupations involved high- or medium-level nonmanual labor, even after adjustment for adult occupational status and risk factors (odds ratio 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.8). No such association appeared in men. Furthermore, the impact of life-course SES on atherosclerosis was examined by using an additive measure of one's combined SES during childhood and adulthood. Among women, the odds of carotid stenosis increased with a rise in exposure to low SES during the life-course (P for trend &lt;0.001). In men, no such trend was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the total life-course exposure to low SES, with contributions from childhood and adulthood, seems to play a role in atherogenesis in women. Such a pattern of association could not be shown in men.},
  author       = {Rosvall, Maria and Östergren, Per-Olof and Hedblad, Bo and Isacsson, Sven-Olof and Janzon, Lars and Berglund, Göran},
  issn         = {1524-4636},
  keyword      = {atherosclerosis,carotid arteries,life-course,socioeconomic status},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1704--1711},
  publisher    = {American Heart Association},
  series       = {Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology},
  title        = {Life-course perspective on socioeconomic differences in carotid atherosclerosis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.ATV.0000032006.75577.24},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2002},
}