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Natural history of patients with unoperated atherosclerotic carotid artery disease--results from a retrospective study

Mätzsch, Thomas LU ; Bergqvist, David; Lindh, Mats LU ; Maly, Pavel LU and Takolander, Rabbe (1993) In European Journal of Vascular Surgery 7(2). p.166-170
Abstract
The natural history of carotid artery disease was studied in a retrospective study of 609 angiograms performed during 1969-1979 on patients who had subsequently not been operated on. The indication for angiography differed, but was aimed at clarifying suspected cerebrovascular events. 578 patients could be followed-up after a median time of 10.4 years (0-22). The median survival time after angiography was 9.7 years for the 355 men and 12.8 years for the 223 women (p = 0.0099). Internal carotid stenosis of > 50% was seen in 9.0% (bilaterally in 2.2%), a stenosis > 75% in 4.5% (bilaterally in 0.9%) and occlusion in 9% (bilaterally in 0.7%). Ulceration was present in 10.7% (bilaterally in 1.6%). 26.5% of the patients had a... (More)
The natural history of carotid artery disease was studied in a retrospective study of 609 angiograms performed during 1969-1979 on patients who had subsequently not been operated on. The indication for angiography differed, but was aimed at clarifying suspected cerebrovascular events. 578 patients could be followed-up after a median time of 10.4 years (0-22). The median survival time after angiography was 9.7 years for the 355 men and 12.8 years for the 223 women (p = 0.0099). Internal carotid stenosis of > 50% was seen in 9.0% (bilaterally in 2.2%), a stenosis > 75% in 4.5% (bilaterally in 0.9%) and occlusion in 9% (bilaterally in 0.7%). Ulceration was present in 10.7% (bilaterally in 1.6%). 26.5% of the patients had a cerebrovascular event during follow-up, of which 31.4% had transient ischaemic attack or amaurosis fugax. Survival was not influenced by the degree of stenosis, but presence of arteriosclerotic carotid artery disease significantly reduced the median survival time from 11 to 3 years. The main cause of death for men was myocardial infarction (27.7%) and for women a cerebrovascular event (27.8%), a significant difference. From this study, in selected patients it can be concluded that the annual frequency of cerebrovascular events was low, approaching frequencies reported in asymptomatic patients. The cause of death differed between men and women, with more cardiac deaths among men and more cerebrovascular deaths among women. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Carotid artery stenosis, Carotid endarterectomy
in
European Journal of Vascular Surgery
volume
7
issue
2
pages
166 - 170
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:8462705
  • scopus:0027233640
ISSN
0950-821X
DOI
10.1016/S0950-821X(05)80757-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
df80ed40-cfc3-4bf1-8cd4-a7e9b8b66c2e (old id 1107299)
date added to LUP
2008-07-30 15:35:44
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:09:39
@article{df80ed40-cfc3-4bf1-8cd4-a7e9b8b66c2e,
  abstract     = {The natural history of carotid artery disease was studied in a retrospective study of 609 angiograms performed during 1969-1979 on patients who had subsequently not been operated on. The indication for angiography differed, but was aimed at clarifying suspected cerebrovascular events. 578 patients could be followed-up after a median time of 10.4 years (0-22). The median survival time after angiography was 9.7 years for the 355 men and 12.8 years for the 223 women (p = 0.0099). Internal carotid stenosis of > 50% was seen in 9.0% (bilaterally in 2.2%), a stenosis > 75% in 4.5% (bilaterally in 0.9%) and occlusion in 9% (bilaterally in 0.7%). Ulceration was present in 10.7% (bilaterally in 1.6%). 26.5% of the patients had a cerebrovascular event during follow-up, of which 31.4% had transient ischaemic attack or amaurosis fugax. Survival was not influenced by the degree of stenosis, but presence of arteriosclerotic carotid artery disease significantly reduced the median survival time from 11 to 3 years. The main cause of death for men was myocardial infarction (27.7%) and for women a cerebrovascular event (27.8%), a significant difference. From this study, in selected patients it can be concluded that the annual frequency of cerebrovascular events was low, approaching frequencies reported in asymptomatic patients. The cause of death differed between men and women, with more cardiac deaths among men and more cerebrovascular deaths among women.},
  author       = {Mätzsch, Thomas and Bergqvist, David and Lindh, Mats and Maly, Pavel and Takolander, Rabbe},
  issn         = {0950-821X},
  keyword      = {Carotid artery stenosis,Carotid endarterectomy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {166--170},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Vascular Surgery},
  title        = {Natural history of patients with unoperated atherosclerotic carotid artery disease--results from a retrospective study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0950-821X(05)80757-1},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {1993},
}