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Predictive value of early continuous amplitude integrated EEG recordings on outcome after severe birth asphyxia in full term infants

Hellström-Westas, Lena LU ; Rosén, Ingmar LU and Svenningsen, N W (1995) In Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition 72(1). p.34-38
Abstract
The background pattern in single channel amplitude integrated EEG recordings (aEEG) was recorded in 47 infants within the first six hours after birth to see if this could predict outcome after birth asphyxia. The aEEG background pattern during the first six hours of life was continuous and of normal voltage in 26 infants. All these infants survived; 25 were healthy, one had delayed psychomotor development. A continuous but extremely low voltage pattern was present in two infants, both of whom survived with severe handicap. Five infants had flat (mainly isoelectric) tracings during the first six hours of life; four died in the neonatal period, and one survived with severe neurological handicap. Burst-suppression pattern was identified in 14... (More)
The background pattern in single channel amplitude integrated EEG recordings (aEEG) was recorded in 47 infants within the first six hours after birth to see if this could predict outcome after birth asphyxia. The aEEG background pattern during the first six hours of life was continuous and of normal voltage in 26 infants. All these infants survived; 25 were healthy, one had delayed psychomotor development. A continuous but extremely low voltage pattern was present in two infants, both of whom survived with severe handicap. Five infants had flat (mainly isoelectric) tracings during the first six hours of life; four died in the neonatal period, and one survived with severe neurological handicap. Burst-suppression pattern was identified in 14 infants, of whom five died, six survived with severe handicap, and three were healthy at follow up. The type of background pattern recorded within the first six postnatal hours in the aEEG tracings predicted outcome correctly in 43 of 47 (91.5%) infants. Use of aEEG monitoring can predict outcome, with a high degree of accuracy, after birth asphyxia, within the first six hours after birth. The predictive value of a suppression-burst pattern was, however, somewhat lower than the other background patterns. The aEEG seems to be a feasible technique for identifying infants at high risk of subsequent brain damage who might benefit from interventionist treatment after asphyxia. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
volume
72
issue
1
pages
34 - 38
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:7743282
  • scopus:0028832920
ISSN
1359-2998
DOI
10.1136/fn.72.1.F34
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e4eebfec-7da7-47ef-9b64-a2a206245347 (old id 1108751)
date added to LUP
2008-07-24 16:07:47
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:31:19
@article{e4eebfec-7da7-47ef-9b64-a2a206245347,
  abstract     = {The background pattern in single channel amplitude integrated EEG recordings (aEEG) was recorded in 47 infants within the first six hours after birth to see if this could predict outcome after birth asphyxia. The aEEG background pattern during the first six hours of life was continuous and of normal voltage in 26 infants. All these infants survived; 25 were healthy, one had delayed psychomotor development. A continuous but extremely low voltage pattern was present in two infants, both of whom survived with severe handicap. Five infants had flat (mainly isoelectric) tracings during the first six hours of life; four died in the neonatal period, and one survived with severe neurological handicap. Burst-suppression pattern was identified in 14 infants, of whom five died, six survived with severe handicap, and three were healthy at follow up. The type of background pattern recorded within the first six postnatal hours in the aEEG tracings predicted outcome correctly in 43 of 47 (91.5%) infants. Use of aEEG monitoring can predict outcome, with a high degree of accuracy, after birth asphyxia, within the first six hours after birth. The predictive value of a suppression-burst pattern was, however, somewhat lower than the other background patterns. The aEEG seems to be a feasible technique for identifying infants at high risk of subsequent brain damage who might benefit from interventionist treatment after asphyxia.},
  author       = {Hellström-Westas, Lena and Rosén, Ingmar and Svenningsen, N W},
  issn         = {1359-2998},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {34--38},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition},
  title        = {Predictive value of early continuous amplitude integrated EEG recordings on outcome after severe birth asphyxia in full term infants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/fn.72.1.F34},
  volume       = {72},
  year         = {1995},
}