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Urinary cotinine in children and adults during and after semiexperimental exposure to environmental tobacco smoke

Willers, Stefan LU ; Skarping, Gunnar LU ; Dalene, Marianne LU and Skerfving, Staffan LU (1995) In Archives of Environmental Health 50(2). p.130-138
Abstract
Urinary cotinine (U-cotinine) as a biomarker of environmental tobacco smoke exposure was evaluated in 14 children (age 4-11 y) and in 7 adults who were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke at an air nicotine level of 110 mg/m3 for 2 h in a bus. Nicotine in air and U-cotinine were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry before, during, and after the experiment. U-cotinine rose rapidly to a maximum after a median of 6 h following the end of exposure; remained at an apparent plateau for half a day; and then decreased exponentially, with a mean half-time of 19 h (95% confidence interval 18-20 h; no significant difference between children and adults). The maximum U-cotinine was higher in the children (mean = 22 mg/l) than in the... (More)
Urinary cotinine (U-cotinine) as a biomarker of environmental tobacco smoke exposure was evaluated in 14 children (age 4-11 y) and in 7 adults who were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke at an air nicotine level of 110 mg/m3 for 2 h in a bus. Nicotine in air and U-cotinine were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry before, during, and after the experiment. U-cotinine rose rapidly to a maximum after a median of 6 h following the end of exposure; remained at an apparent plateau for half a day; and then decreased exponentially, with a mean half-time of 19 h (95% confidence interval 18-20 h; no significant difference between children and adults). The maximum U-cotinine was higher in the children (mean = 22 mg/l) than in the adults (13 mg/l; p = .005); decreased with age among the children (r = -.74; p = .002); and increased as the estimated inhaled nicotine dose increased. Therefore, the findings of the present study showed that young children had higher U-cotinine than adults at the same experimental environmental tobacco smoke exposure, probably because they had a higher relative nicotine dose because of a higher relative ventilation rate, and possibly also because of metabolic differences; the elimination rate did not differ. The long half-time makes U-cotinine a good biomarker of environmental tobacco smoke exposure; the time of sampling is not very critical. Dilution-adjusted concentrations should be employed, and in children, preferably by density correction. A certain urinary cotinine level indicates a lower environmental tobacco smoke exposure in a small child than in an adult. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Environmental Health
volume
50
issue
2
pages
130 - 138
publisher
Heldref Publications
external identifiers
  • pmid:7786049
  • scopus:0029060716
ISSN
0003-9896
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
20bf3da9-0d4e-4c00-aec7-25dee5b88326 (old id 1109633)
alternative location
http://elin.lub.lu.se/cgi-bin/linker/ebsco_local?9507100263
date added to LUP
2008-07-29 11:51:46
date last changed
2017-08-27 05:17:40
@article{20bf3da9-0d4e-4c00-aec7-25dee5b88326,
  abstract     = {Urinary cotinine (U-cotinine) as a biomarker of environmental tobacco smoke exposure was evaluated in 14 children (age 4-11 y) and in 7 adults who were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke at an air nicotine level of 110 mg/m3 for 2 h in a bus. Nicotine in air and U-cotinine were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry before, during, and after the experiment. U-cotinine rose rapidly to a maximum after a median of 6 h following the end of exposure; remained at an apparent plateau for half a day; and then decreased exponentially, with a mean half-time of 19 h (95% confidence interval 18-20 h; no significant difference between children and adults). The maximum U-cotinine was higher in the children (mean = 22 mg/l) than in the adults (13 mg/l; p = .005); decreased with age among the children (r = -.74; p = .002); and increased as the estimated inhaled nicotine dose increased. Therefore, the findings of the present study showed that young children had higher U-cotinine than adults at the same experimental environmental tobacco smoke exposure, probably because they had a higher relative nicotine dose because of a higher relative ventilation rate, and possibly also because of metabolic differences; the elimination rate did not differ. The long half-time makes U-cotinine a good biomarker of environmental tobacco smoke exposure; the time of sampling is not very critical. Dilution-adjusted concentrations should be employed, and in children, preferably by density correction. A certain urinary cotinine level indicates a lower environmental tobacco smoke exposure in a small child than in an adult.},
  author       = {Willers, Stefan and Skarping, Gunnar and Dalene, Marianne and Skerfving, Staffan},
  issn         = {0003-9896},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {130--138},
  publisher    = {Heldref Publications},
  series       = {Archives of Environmental Health},
  title        = {Urinary cotinine in children and adults during and after semiexperimental exposure to environmental tobacco smoke},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {1995},
}