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Environment, social interaction, and physical activity as determinants of functional outcome after cerebral infarction in the rat

Johansson, Barbro LU and Ohlsson, Anna-Lena (1996) In Experimental Neurology 139(2). p.322-327
Abstract
Rats housed in an enriched environment allowing both social interaction and physical activity improve more than rats housed in standard laboratory cages after focal brain ischemia. To determine the relative importance of social and physical activity, rats that sustained ligation of the middle cerebral artery were kept in an enriched environment with opportunities for various activities (group A), housed together in the same size of cage as group A but with no activity-stimulating equipment (group B), or housed in individual cages with a running wheel (group C). There was no significant difference in infarct size between the groups. Limb placement, climbing, balance on an inclined plane, and ability to traverse a beam and a rotating pole... (More)
Rats housed in an enriched environment allowing both social interaction and physical activity improve more than rats housed in standard laboratory cages after focal brain ischemia. To determine the relative importance of social and physical activity, rats that sustained ligation of the middle cerebral artery were kept in an enriched environment with opportunities for various activities (group A), housed together in the same size of cage as group A but with no activity-stimulating equipment (group B), or housed in individual cages with a running wheel (group C). There was no significant difference in infarct size between the groups. Limb placement, climbing, balance on an inclined plane, and ability to traverse a beam and a rotating pole were repeatedly tested 2-13 weeks after the operation. During the entire postoperative period, group A performed significantly better than group C in all tests and better than group B on the rotating pole. With time they also performed significantly better than group B in limb placement, climbing, and on the inclined plane. Group B performed significantly better than group C on the inclined plane and in climbing at all times, and by 13 weeks also in the limb placement test and on the beam. Thus, social interaction was superior to wheel-running but an enriched environment allowing free physical activity combined with social interaction resulted in the best performance. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Experimental Neurology
volume
139
issue
2
pages
322 - 327
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:8654535
  • scopus:0030158237
ISSN
0014-4886
DOI
10.1006/exnr.1996.0106
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5ab7b8a9-b458-4226-bf72-78e194364fc2 (old id 1110342)
date added to LUP
2008-07-24 10:00:15
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:43:09
@article{5ab7b8a9-b458-4226-bf72-78e194364fc2,
  abstract     = {Rats housed in an enriched environment allowing both social interaction and physical activity improve more than rats housed in standard laboratory cages after focal brain ischemia. To determine the relative importance of social and physical activity, rats that sustained ligation of the middle cerebral artery were kept in an enriched environment with opportunities for various activities (group A), housed together in the same size of cage as group A but with no activity-stimulating equipment (group B), or housed in individual cages with a running wheel (group C). There was no significant difference in infarct size between the groups. Limb placement, climbing, balance on an inclined plane, and ability to traverse a beam and a rotating pole were repeatedly tested 2-13 weeks after the operation. During the entire postoperative period, group A performed significantly better than group C in all tests and better than group B on the rotating pole. With time they also performed significantly better than group B in limb placement, climbing, and on the inclined plane. Group B performed significantly better than group C on the inclined plane and in climbing at all times, and by 13 weeks also in the limb placement test and on the beam. Thus, social interaction was superior to wheel-running but an enriched environment allowing free physical activity combined with social interaction resulted in the best performance.},
  author       = {Johansson, Barbro and Ohlsson, Anna-Lena},
  issn         = {0014-4886},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {322--327},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Experimental Neurology},
  title        = {Environment, social interaction, and physical activity as determinants of functional outcome after cerebral infarction in the rat},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/exnr.1996.0106},
  volume       = {139},
  year         = {1996},
}