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Proprioception after an acute knee ligament injury: a longitudinal study on 16 consecutive patients

Fridén, Thomas LU ; Roberts, David LU ; Zätterstrom, Rose; Lindstrand, Anders LU and Moritz, Ulrich LU (1997) In Journal of Orthopaedic Research 15(5). p.637-644
Abstract
A defect in proprioception has been found in selected patient groups that have an anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee at different times after the original injury. The time of development and the extent of such defects were studied longitudinally on 16 consecutive patients. During the first year after a primary knee injury, which included a complete rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, we repeatedly performed three tests of proprioception: (a) one to determine the threshold for detecting a passive motion from starting positions of 20 and 40 degrees, (b) an active reproduction of a passive angular change, and (c) a visual estimation of a passive angular change. The injured limb was compared with the uninjured limb and with the... (More)
A defect in proprioception has been found in selected patient groups that have an anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee at different times after the original injury. The time of development and the extent of such defects were studied longitudinally on 16 consecutive patients. During the first year after a primary knee injury, which included a complete rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, we repeatedly performed three tests of proprioception: (a) one to determine the threshold for detecting a passive motion from starting positions of 20 and 40 degrees, (b) an active reproduction of a passive angular change, and (c) a visual estimation of a passive angular change. The injured limb was compared with the uninjured limb and with the limbs of an age-matched reference group of healthy subjects. The population did not have a normal distribution, and some patients had consistently extreme recordings in the threshold tests at the various times of testing. Significant differences were found between the groups at the starting position of 20 degrees, when the injured knee was compared with the uninjured knee, after 1 month (p = 0.05), and after 2 months (p = 0.03). There was a trend toward a higher threshold for detecting a passive motion when the injured side was compared with the knees of the reference group at 1 month (p = 0.06) but not later on. A similar pattern was found for the injured knee at the starting position of 40 degrees, but it was not significant. An impaired ability to detect a passive motion was registered for the nearly extended knee 1 and 2 months after a primary injury. In the active reproduction and visual estimation tests, no significant defects were found at any time during the first year in these consecutively studied patients. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Orthopaedic Research
volume
15
issue
5
pages
637 - 644
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:9420590
  • scopus:0031227409
ISSN
1554-527X
DOI
10.1002/jor.1100150502
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e4082d17-09e3-4afb-bed2-19896b0848bb (old id 1112569)
date added to LUP
2008-07-17 08:52:02
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:41:49
@article{e4082d17-09e3-4afb-bed2-19896b0848bb,
  abstract     = {A defect in proprioception has been found in selected patient groups that have an anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee at different times after the original injury. The time of development and the extent of such defects were studied longitudinally on 16 consecutive patients. During the first year after a primary knee injury, which included a complete rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, we repeatedly performed three tests of proprioception: (a) one to determine the threshold for detecting a passive motion from starting positions of 20 and 40 degrees, (b) an active reproduction of a passive angular change, and (c) a visual estimation of a passive angular change. The injured limb was compared with the uninjured limb and with the limbs of an age-matched reference group of healthy subjects. The population did not have a normal distribution, and some patients had consistently extreme recordings in the threshold tests at the various times of testing. Significant differences were found between the groups at the starting position of 20 degrees, when the injured knee was compared with the uninjured knee, after 1 month (p = 0.05), and after 2 months (p = 0.03). There was a trend toward a higher threshold for detecting a passive motion when the injured side was compared with the knees of the reference group at 1 month (p = 0.06) but not later on. A similar pattern was found for the injured knee at the starting position of 40 degrees, but it was not significant. An impaired ability to detect a passive motion was registered for the nearly extended knee 1 and 2 months after a primary injury. In the active reproduction and visual estimation tests, no significant defects were found at any time during the first year in these consecutively studied patients.},
  author       = {Fridén, Thomas and Roberts, David and Zätterstrom, Rose and Lindstrand, Anders and Moritz, Ulrich},
  issn         = {1554-527X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {637--644},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Orthopaedic Research},
  title        = {Proprioception after an acute knee ligament injury: a longitudinal study on 16 consecutive patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.1100150502},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {1997},
}