Advanced

Severe gastritis in guinea-pigs infected with Helicobacter pylori

Sturegård, Erik LU ; Sjunnesson, Håkan LU ; Ho, B; Willen, R; Aleljung, P; Ng, H C and Wadström, Torkel LU (1998) In Journal of Medical Microbiology 47(12). p.1123-1129
Abstract
An appropriate animal model is essential to study Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate if H. pylori can colonise the guinea-pig stomach and whether the infection causes gastritis and a serological response similar to that observed in man. Guinea-pigs were infected either with fresh H. pylori isolates from human gastric biopsies or with a guinea-pig passaged strain. When the animals were killed, 3 and 7 weeks after inoculation, samples were taken for culture, histopathology and serology. H. pylori was cultured from 22 of 29 challenged animals. All culture-positive animals exhibited a specific immune response against H. pylori antigens in Western blotting and gastritis in histopathological examination.... (More)
An appropriate animal model is essential to study Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate if H. pylori can colonise the guinea-pig stomach and whether the infection causes gastritis and a serological response similar to that observed in man. Guinea-pigs were infected either with fresh H. pylori isolates from human gastric biopsies or with a guinea-pig passaged strain. When the animals were killed, 3 and 7 weeks after inoculation, samples were taken for culture, histopathology and serology. H. pylori was cultured from 22 of 29 challenged animals. All culture-positive animals exhibited a specific immune response against H. pylori antigens in Western blotting and gastritis in histopathological examination. Antibody titres in enzyme immunoassay were elevated among animals challenged with H. pylori. The inflammatory response was graded as severe in most animals and consisted of both polymorphonuclear leucocytes and lymphocytes. Erosion of the gastric epithelium was found in infected animals. These results suggest that the guinea-pig is suitable for studying H. pylori-associated diseases. Moreover, guinea-pigs are probably more similar to man than any other small laboratory animal as regards gastric anatomy and physiology. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Medical Microbiology
volume
47
issue
12
pages
1123 - 1129
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:9856649
  • scopus:0031759841
ISSN
0022-2615
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
388b1e97-1dfe-4801-a8ad-6d700cdb78dd (old id 1113258)
alternative location
http://jmm.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/47/12/1123
date added to LUP
2008-07-14 15:45:14
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:42:21
@article{388b1e97-1dfe-4801-a8ad-6d700cdb78dd,
  abstract     = {An appropriate animal model is essential to study Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate if H. pylori can colonise the guinea-pig stomach and whether the infection causes gastritis and a serological response similar to that observed in man. Guinea-pigs were infected either with fresh H. pylori isolates from human gastric biopsies or with a guinea-pig passaged strain. When the animals were killed, 3 and 7 weeks after inoculation, samples were taken for culture, histopathology and serology. H. pylori was cultured from 22 of 29 challenged animals. All culture-positive animals exhibited a specific immune response against H. pylori antigens in Western blotting and gastritis in histopathological examination. Antibody titres in enzyme immunoassay were elevated among animals challenged with H. pylori. The inflammatory response was graded as severe in most animals and consisted of both polymorphonuclear leucocytes and lymphocytes. Erosion of the gastric epithelium was found in infected animals. These results suggest that the guinea-pig is suitable for studying H. pylori-associated diseases. Moreover, guinea-pigs are probably more similar to man than any other small laboratory animal as regards gastric anatomy and physiology.},
  author       = {Sturegård, Erik and Sjunnesson, Håkan and Ho, B and Willen, R and Aleljung, P and Ng, H C and Wadström, Torkel},
  issn         = {0022-2615},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1123--1129},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Medical Microbiology},
  title        = {Severe gastritis in guinea-pigs infected with Helicobacter pylori},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {1998},
}