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Function of adult pig hearts after 2 and 12 hours of cold cardioplegic preservation

Budrikis, A; Bolys, R; Liao, Q; Ingemansson, Richard LU ; Sjöberg, Trygve LU and Steen, Stig LU (1998) In Annals of Thoracic Surgery 66(1). p.73-78
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most cardioplegic solutions have been developed using the classic Langendorf heart perfusion model, which only allows a short experimental follow-up. Our aim was to investigate hearts after prolonged storage by using a physiologic model including prolonged perfusion with normal, fresh blood. METHODS: Sixteen hearts from 60-kg pigs were preserved with dextran-enriched (dextran-40, 35 g/L) St. Thomas' solution for 2 or 12 hours after which they were continuously reperfused for 12 hours with normal blood, supplied by a support pig. A flexible balloon, fixed to an artificial valve apparatus connected to a circuit system, was inserted in the left ventricle for obtaining measurements of hemodynamic performance. RESULTS: During the... (More)
BACKGROUND: Most cardioplegic solutions have been developed using the classic Langendorf heart perfusion model, which only allows a short experimental follow-up. Our aim was to investigate hearts after prolonged storage by using a physiologic model including prolonged perfusion with normal, fresh blood. METHODS: Sixteen hearts from 60-kg pigs were preserved with dextran-enriched (dextran-40, 35 g/L) St. Thomas' solution for 2 or 12 hours after which they were continuously reperfused for 12 hours with normal blood, supplied by a support pig. A flexible balloon, fixed to an artificial valve apparatus connected to a circuit system, was inserted in the left ventricle for obtaining measurements of hemodynamic performance. RESULTS: During the first 3 to 4 hours of reperfusion there was no significant difference in left ventricular developed pressure, cardiac output, minute work output, or oxygen consumption between the two groups. After this time left ventricular developed pressure (p < 0.001), cardiac output (p < 0.01), minute work output (p < 0.01), and oxygen consumption were significantly lower in the 12-hour group. Coronary flow was higher (p < 0.01) and coronary vascular resistance lower (p < 0.01) during the first 5 to 6 hours of reperfusion in the 12-hour group. After 12 hours of reperfusion coronary vascular resistance was significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the 12-hour group. CONCLUSIONS: High-degree and long-lasting coronary hyperemia at the beginning of reperfusion can be a sign of unsatisfactory preservation of the heart. This investigation shows the importance of reperfusion with normal blood and a long follow-up period after postischemic reperfusion when studying the effect of cardioplegic solutions. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Thoracic Surgery
volume
66
issue
1
pages
73 - 78
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:9692441
  • scopus:0032126649
ISSN
1552-6259
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
97cd79fc-9704-451d-9046-74156fca641d (old id 1113824)
alternative location
http://ats.ctsnetjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/66/1/73
date added to LUP
2008-07-16 12:09:12
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:41:41
@article{97cd79fc-9704-451d-9046-74156fca641d,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Most cardioplegic solutions have been developed using the classic Langendorf heart perfusion model, which only allows a short experimental follow-up. Our aim was to investigate hearts after prolonged storage by using a physiologic model including prolonged perfusion with normal, fresh blood. METHODS: Sixteen hearts from 60-kg pigs were preserved with dextran-enriched (dextran-40, 35 g/L) St. Thomas' solution for 2 or 12 hours after which they were continuously reperfused for 12 hours with normal blood, supplied by a support pig. A flexible balloon, fixed to an artificial valve apparatus connected to a circuit system, was inserted in the left ventricle for obtaining measurements of hemodynamic performance. RESULTS: During the first 3 to 4 hours of reperfusion there was no significant difference in left ventricular developed pressure, cardiac output, minute work output, or oxygen consumption between the two groups. After this time left ventricular developed pressure (p &lt; 0.001), cardiac output (p &lt; 0.01), minute work output (p &lt; 0.01), and oxygen consumption were significantly lower in the 12-hour group. Coronary flow was higher (p &lt; 0.01) and coronary vascular resistance lower (p &lt; 0.01) during the first 5 to 6 hours of reperfusion in the 12-hour group. After 12 hours of reperfusion coronary vascular resistance was significantly higher (p &lt; 0.01) in the 12-hour group. CONCLUSIONS: High-degree and long-lasting coronary hyperemia at the beginning of reperfusion can be a sign of unsatisfactory preservation of the heart. This investigation shows the importance of reperfusion with normal blood and a long follow-up period after postischemic reperfusion when studying the effect of cardioplegic solutions.},
  author       = {Budrikis, A and Bolys, R and Liao, Q and Ingemansson, Richard and Sjöberg, Trygve and Steen, Stig},
  issn         = {1552-6259},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {73--78},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Annals of Thoracic Surgery},
  title        = {Function of adult pig hearts after 2 and 12 hours of cold cardioplegic preservation},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {1998},
}