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Lupine-induced anaphylaxis

Matheu, Victor LU ; de Barrio, M; Sierra, Z; Gracia-Bara, M T; Tornero, P and Baeza, M L (1999) In Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 83(5). p.406-408
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Legumes are one of the most common foods causing allergic reactions in children and adults. Cross-reacting antibodies are frequently demonstrated in this family but the real clinical cross-reactivity is uncommon. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of lupine-induced anaphylaxis and to elucidate in vivo and in vitro cross-reactivity with some legumes. METHODS: Skin prick test (SPT) with some legumes were performed. Cap-IgE, ELISA-IgE, and immunoblotting were carried out. Open oral challenges with some legumes were performed. Cross-reactivity was studied by ELISA and immunoblotting inhibition. RESULTS: The results demonstrated type-I hypersensitivity reactions with lupine and some other legumes. Cap-IgE with peanut was positive but the... (More)
BACKGROUND: Legumes are one of the most common foods causing allergic reactions in children and adults. Cross-reacting antibodies are frequently demonstrated in this family but the real clinical cross-reactivity is uncommon. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of lupine-induced anaphylaxis and to elucidate in vivo and in vitro cross-reactivity with some legumes. METHODS: Skin prick test (SPT) with some legumes were performed. Cap-IgE, ELISA-IgE, and immunoblotting were carried out. Open oral challenges with some legumes were performed. Cross-reactivity was studied by ELISA and immunoblotting inhibition. RESULTS: The results demonstrated type-I hypersensitivity reactions with lupine and some other legumes. Cap-IgE with peanut was positive but the SPT and ELISA-IgE were negative and the patient tolerated a peanut challenge. ELISA inhibition revealed a partial inhibition (62%) using lupine as the solid phase. Partial inhibition was demonstrated by immunoblotting inhibition. Open oral challenge with peanut and green bean were negative but positive with pea. CONCLUSION: We present a lupine sensitized patient with positive SPT and in vitro cross-reactivity with other legumes. Clinical cross-reactivity progressively developed over a 5-year period. Discrepancies were found between the clinical aspect and in vitro study of peanut allergy. Factors determining the wide variability in cross-reactivity among individuals are still obscure. (Less)
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author
organization
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publication status
published
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in
Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
volume
83
issue
5
pages
406 - 408
publisher
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
external identifiers
  • pmid:10582721
ISSN
1081-1206
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0f8b049e-3955-426f-b50d-ea0433b34be5 (old id 1114229)
date added to LUP
2008-07-03 14:58:42
date last changed
2016-04-15 20:06:27
@article{0f8b049e-3955-426f-b50d-ea0433b34be5,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Legumes are one of the most common foods causing allergic reactions in children and adults. Cross-reacting antibodies are frequently demonstrated in this family but the real clinical cross-reactivity is uncommon. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of lupine-induced anaphylaxis and to elucidate in vivo and in vitro cross-reactivity with some legumes. METHODS: Skin prick test (SPT) with some legumes were performed. Cap-IgE, ELISA-IgE, and immunoblotting were carried out. Open oral challenges with some legumes were performed. Cross-reactivity was studied by ELISA and immunoblotting inhibition. RESULTS: The results demonstrated type-I hypersensitivity reactions with lupine and some other legumes. Cap-IgE with peanut was positive but the SPT and ELISA-IgE were negative and the patient tolerated a peanut challenge. ELISA inhibition revealed a partial inhibition (62%) using lupine as the solid phase. Partial inhibition was demonstrated by immunoblotting inhibition. Open oral challenge with peanut and green bean were negative but positive with pea. CONCLUSION: We present a lupine sensitized patient with positive SPT and in vitro cross-reactivity with other legumes. Clinical cross-reactivity progressively developed over a 5-year period. Discrepancies were found between the clinical aspect and in vitro study of peanut allergy. Factors determining the wide variability in cross-reactivity among individuals are still obscure.},
  author       = {Matheu, Victor and de Barrio, M and Sierra, Z and Gracia-Bara, M T and Tornero, P and Baeza, M L},
  issn         = {1081-1206},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {406--408},
  publisher    = {American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology},
  series       = {Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology},
  title        = {Lupine-induced anaphylaxis},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {1999},
}