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Vascular function in the cadaver up to six hours after cardiac arrest

Bolys, Ramunas; Ingemansson, Richard LU ; Sjöberg, Trygve LU and Steen, Stig LU (1999) In The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation 18(6). p.582-586
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate how well vascular function is retained in a cadaver kept in a room with a temperature of 21 degrees C. METHODS: The aorta and pulmonary artery of rats were investigated in organ baths as fresh controls and after 1, 2, 3, or 6 hours' storage in the cadaver. Six-hour-old cadaver aortas were transplanted and investigated after 24 hours and 60 days. RESULTS: After 3 hours' storage there was no significant decrease in smooth muscle contractile function in either aorta or pulmonary artery. After 6 hours' storage both the aorta and the pulmonary artery demonstrated a significant decrease in smooth muscle contractile function, 30% (p < 0.05) and 44% (p < 0.001), respectively, compared to fresh... (More)
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate how well vascular function is retained in a cadaver kept in a room with a temperature of 21 degrees C. METHODS: The aorta and pulmonary artery of rats were investigated in organ baths as fresh controls and after 1, 2, 3, or 6 hours' storage in the cadaver. Six-hour-old cadaver aortas were transplanted and investigated after 24 hours and 60 days. RESULTS: After 3 hours' storage there was no significant decrease in smooth muscle contractile function in either aorta or pulmonary artery. After 6 hours' storage both the aorta and the pulmonary artery demonstrated a significant decrease in smooth muscle contractile function, 30% (p < 0.05) and 44% (p < 0.001), respectively, compared to fresh controls. Storing the aorta for 2 hours and the pulmonary artery for 6 hours caused no significant decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxing function. In aorta segments investigated after 3 and 6 hours there was a significant decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation, 12% (p < 0.05) and 29% (p < 0.001), respectively. Six-hour-old cadaver aortas transplanted and investigated after 24 hours or 60 days demonstrated no significant changes in endothelium-dependent relaxation and smooth muscle function compared to fresh controls. CONCLUSION: The pulmonary artery can tolerate 3 hours of warm ischemia in the nonheart-beating cadaver without loss of endothelium-dependent relaxation and smooth muscle function. The dysfunction seen in 6-hour-old cadaver aortas was normalized after transplantation and 24 hours of reperfusion. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
volume
18
issue
6
pages
582 - 586
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:10395356
  • scopus:0033063689
ISSN
1557-3117
DOI
10.1016/S1053-2498(98)00075-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
52dada87-452e-4c6b-bc18-3e9134fecac7 (old id 1115878)
date added to LUP
2008-07-08 15:27:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:00:36
@article{52dada87-452e-4c6b-bc18-3e9134fecac7,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate how well vascular function is retained in a cadaver kept in a room with a temperature of 21 degrees C. METHODS: The aorta and pulmonary artery of rats were investigated in organ baths as fresh controls and after 1, 2, 3, or 6 hours' storage in the cadaver. Six-hour-old cadaver aortas were transplanted and investigated after 24 hours and 60 days. RESULTS: After 3 hours' storage there was no significant decrease in smooth muscle contractile function in either aorta or pulmonary artery. After 6 hours' storage both the aorta and the pulmonary artery demonstrated a significant decrease in smooth muscle contractile function, 30% (p &lt; 0.05) and 44% (p &lt; 0.001), respectively, compared to fresh controls. Storing the aorta for 2 hours and the pulmonary artery for 6 hours caused no significant decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxing function. In aorta segments investigated after 3 and 6 hours there was a significant decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation, 12% (p &lt; 0.05) and 29% (p &lt; 0.001), respectively. Six-hour-old cadaver aortas transplanted and investigated after 24 hours or 60 days demonstrated no significant changes in endothelium-dependent relaxation and smooth muscle function compared to fresh controls. CONCLUSION: The pulmonary artery can tolerate 3 hours of warm ischemia in the nonheart-beating cadaver without loss of endothelium-dependent relaxation and smooth muscle function. The dysfunction seen in 6-hour-old cadaver aortas was normalized after transplantation and 24 hours of reperfusion.},
  author       = {Bolys, Ramunas and Ingemansson, Richard and Sjöberg, Trygve and Steen, Stig},
  issn         = {1557-3117},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {582--586},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation},
  title        = {Vascular function in the cadaver up to six hours after cardiac arrest},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1053-2498(98)00075-8},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {1999},
}